jaymanntoday

Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

5/29/14 Truck overturns and rains back-off ... weekend lookin' decent.

Thursday, May 29, 2014: I came that close to inviting home a 28-incher but, as usually happens, he looked me in the eyes and sent me a message “Don’t do it, dude … please.” I repented and released … then realized that fish isn’t so kind when he’s sucking down begging bunker and cringing crabs.

Lightish winds tomorrow and not-bad winds over the weekend could make this another just-fine fishing stretch.

While I’m getting more bass info from just to our north (IBSP up to Seaside), I also continue to get info on fun surfside stripering on LBI.

The winds make it seem the fishing has cooled but that is likely due to fewer anglers in action.

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BEACH GRAINS: The beaches are lookin’ mighty good right about now, especially Ship Bottom, which has accrued the littoral drift benefits of sands formerly pumped onto Surf City -- and even Harvey Cedars -- beaches. It also abuts with the Brant Beach replen, though there is very little grain drain from the south, heading northward.

For those wondering about the scheduled Island-long beach replenishment, there isn’t a whole lot new going on. Chatting with Army Corps folks this weekend, the project will likely go out to bid in October and begin in November. It is at the discretion of the winning bidder as to where the work will begin, be it north, south, both or middle. I’m big on a shotgun start at both ends, working toward the middle.

As to any last-minute variations to the established profiling of the replenished beaches, i.e. the shape of the finalized replenished beaches, it all comes down to expense. For whatever technical reasons, even simple tweaks and variations can cost, big time. That’s not to say there isn’t some waggle room but I sure wouldn’t bank on big changes. There’s absolutely no harm in trying, though.  

Here’s a contact point/petition pushing for a redesign of replen plans: http://www.change.org/petitions/new-jersey-dep-and-usace-modify-the...

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Some fine lures at Viking Outfitters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXYBXk-J0AU&feature=youtu.be

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Today's truck rollover in Surf City: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-44Z6ylNOs

Also see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=99rt_KN2drc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1p1cxxQA4OM

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NMFS raising general category Atlantic bluefin tuna limit from one to four fish

SEAFOODNEWS.COM [Examiner] - May 29, 2014 - 

The Atlantic bluefin tuna catch limit has once again been readjusted for the summer.

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration is announcing in the Federal Register of Thursday, May 29, 2014 that it is increasing the general category daily retention limit for Atlantic bluefin tuna from the default level of one medium or giant fish all the way up to four fish. The new limit takes effect June 1 and runs through Aug. 31.

The tuna involved measure at least 73 inches (185 cm) curved fork length. NMFS reminds fishermen that the limit applies per day or trip – four bluefin per day if a boat takes two trips a day, or four fish if it stays at sea overnight.

The tuna are now swimming north toward the northeast coast fishing areas, as they do this time of year. Based on fishing patterns over the last few years, NMFS figures that boats could take up to four of the tuna without exceeding the quotas assigned under the Consolidated Highly Migratory Species Fishery Management Plan. In fact, NMFS figures that with a lower limit than four, it might have to increase the catch limit substantially for the rest of the year. The agency reserves the right to alter the catch limit if circumstances warrant.

But if it allowed a five-fish limit, it would have to cut back for the fall, the agency figures. Besides, fish caught in the summer tend to taste better. NMFS notes that it will collect more data over the summer to assess the fishery.

Because of timeliness, NMFS says it could not put the rule up for public comment before implementing it. It based the decision on information that came in right up to the last minute. And delaying the increase could result in underharvest.

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logo

For Immediate Release                    Contact: Bailey Hall (202) 225-4765                    runyan.house.gov                05/29/2014

Runyan Amendment to Protect Fishing Communities Passes Committee

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.-This afternoon, the House Committee on Natural Resources passed Congressman Jon Runyan’s (NJ-03) amendment to H.R.4742, the Strengthening Fishing Communities and Increasing Flexibility in Fisheries Management Act. H.R. 4742 would reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act for 5 years.

The amendment, which passed by voice vote, would require the Secretary of Commerce to publish the estimated cost of recovery for a fishery resources disaster no later than 30 days after declaring such a disaster. 

“I am pleased that the Committee has passed my bipartisan, straightforward amendment that is needed so that when the next natural disaster decimates a fishing community, that community will receive timely data and not be forced to suffer like the fishermen in New Jersey and New York had to in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy,” said Runyan. “It should not take months and months for NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) to release damage estimates, and my amendment will help protect fishing communities so that they can receive the appropriate amount of aid in a timely manner.” 

On November 16, 2012 the Secretary of Commerce declared a fisheries resource disaster for the States of New Jersey and New York in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. 

In December of 2012 Rep. Runyan requested NOAA to provide the estimated cost of recovery for New Jersey fishing communities. 

On January 15, 2013 Hurricane Sandy recovery legislation passed the House with only $5 million in fisheries disaster aid.  This aid was originally going to be split amongst every state in the country with a fisheries disaster, but Rep. Runyan added an amendment to restrict the money to New Jersey and New York. 

On March 15, 2013, four months after declaring a fishery disaster, NOAA finally released its cost estimate for the fishery disaster in New York and New Jersey, and much too late to be included in recovery legislation

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Memorial Weekend greeted the captains of the Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association with beautiful weather, and a wide variety of fish were available to make fishing trips productive. Although a nor’easter has hit this week, the upcoming weekend in Beach Haven promises to be a nice one.

Captain John Koegler had a party out of “Pop’s Pride” on a back bay trip and found some nice striped bass and black drumfish. On Sunday afternoon Captain John took the “Starfish” out in the ocean looking for stripers to no avail. He finished the day up on the Garden State South Reef where he caught mostly spiny dogfish up to 37-inches along with some smaller sea bass. Captain Carl Sheppard will be skippering the “Starfish” now and says the fishing is just getting started.

Captain Gary Dugan of “Irish Jig” Sportfishing opened the fluke season in Great Bay where he reports he had to weed through a bunch of small fish but did manage to put 2 fat fish in the cooler. The next day he went out for drumfish, and despite finding no drum, he managed some nice fluke, bluefish, and nonstop big dogfish. Captain Gary had two trips on Sunday. In the morning his charter put 5 nice fluke in the box, and his night drumfish trip resulted in a 50-pound black drum.

Captain Dave Kreines had Jim Anderson and son Larry out on the “Byte Me” for a post-Memorial Day of fluking. They fished Great Bay using Gulp and spearing for bait. They picked up three keepers to 23-inches along with about a dozen shorts. They also had action on skates and dogfish making it a fun day topped by a fish dinner.

Captain Bob Gerkens brought his boat “Hot Tuna” back to Beach Haven from Morehead City last week, a “50 hour canyon fishing trip” as Bob calls it. In the southern canyons a number of nice Mahi were caught of which 4 were gaffers. They also caught some blackfin tuna and released a 4-foot mako.

He reports that he reached a nice warm eddy of water in a more northern canyon which is regularly fished out of Beach Haven. They found schools of both bluefin and yellowfin which they worked until dark. Three former US Marines from North Carolina crewed and fished on the trip north. This might be a good time to look into an offshore charter before the crowds start sailing to the canyons.

Additional information on the Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association can be found at www.BHCFA.org.

Memorial Weekend greeted the captains of the Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association with beautiful weather, and a wide variety of fish were available to make fishing trips productive. Although a nor’easter has hit this week, the upcoming weekend in Beach Haven promises to be a nice one. Captain John Koegler had a party out of “Pop’s Pride” on a back bay trip and found some nice striped bass and black drumfish. On Sunday afternoon Captain John took the “Starfish” out in the ocean looking for stripers to no avail. He finished the day up on the Garden State South Reef where he caught mostly spiny dogfish up to 37-inches along with some smaller sea bass. Captain Carl Sheppard will be skippering the “Starfish” now and says the fishing is just getting started. Captain Gary Dugan of “Irish Jig” Sportfishing opened the fluke season in Great Bay where he reports he had to weed through a bunch of small fish but did manage to put 2 fat fish in the cooler. The next day he went out for drumfish, and despite finding no drum, he managed some nice fluke, bluefish, and nonstop big dogfish. Captain Gary had two trips on Sunday. In the morning his charter put 5 nice fluke in the box, and his night drumfish trip resulted in a 50-pound black drum. Captain Dave Kreines had Jim Anderson and son Larry out on the “Byte Me” for a post-Memorial Day of fluking. They fished Great Bay using Gulp and spearing for bait. They picked up three keepers to 23-inches along with about a dozen shorts. They also had action on skates and dogfish making it a fun day topped by a fish dinner. Captain Bob Gerkens brought his boat “Hot Tuna” back to Beach Haven from Morehead City last week, a “50 hour canyon fishing trip” as Bob calls it. In the southern canyons a number of nice Mahi were caught of which 4 were gaffers. They also caught some blackfin tuna and released a 4-foot mako. He reports that he reached a nice warm eddy of water in a more northern canyon which is regularly fished out of Beach Haven. They found schools of both bluefin and yellowfin which they worked until dark. Three former US Marines from North Carolina crewed and fished on the trip north. This might be a good time to look into an offshore charter before the crowds start sailing to the canyons. Additional information on the Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association can be found at <a href=www.BHCFA.org." width="470" height="351" />

THIS WILL IMPACT ALL OF US: 

USDA economist says all perishable foods have entered a period of sharply rising prices

SEAFOODNEWS.COM  [Los Angeles Times]  By Alana Semuels May 23, 2014

It's not just your imagination: You are spending more money at the grocery store these days as the price of limes, shrimp, hamburgers and bacon skyrockets.
 
Prices are rising, and not just with those foods that have been affected by Mexican drug cartels or been hamstrung by epidemics of pig diarrhea.
 
Even when adjusted for inflation, the price of flour has gone up 50% in the last decade, bacon is up 41% and beef is up 30%. Just about the only things that have stayed the same, when adjusted for inflation: malt beverages, which went down in price, and chips, which grew about 3% in price.
 
"We had a period of stable, predictable retail food prices from 1990-2006, when food prices did pretty much the same thing every year," said Richard Volpe, a research economist with the Food Markets Branch of the Food Economics Division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. "But since 2006, retail food prices have risen faster than overall economy-wise prices."
 
So what's going on?
 
First of all, it's perishables that are jumping in price - meats, dairy, fruit. Foods such as soda, candy and crackers are staying relatively flat.
 
That's because around the world, as developing countries get richer, their residents are clamoring for more meat, fruit and dairy. Basic laws of economics tell us that when demand goes up, prices do too, unless supply goes up as well. And supply of these items has, in fact, been going down, Volpe said.
 
First there was the drought in Texas and the West that forced the price of feed up. Farmers, frustrated with high feed prices, sold their cows. And now the U.S. has low cattle inventory.
 
Then consumers turned to pork when beef prices got too high, but supply was limited by a porcine diarrhea epidemic that killed off pigs around the world.
 
Consumers then turned to turkey, chicken and other meats, causing those prices to rise too.
 
But it's not just meat that has been volatile: freezes in California drove up prices of oranges and nectarines. A deadly citrus greening epidemic has killed off millions of pounds of fruit over the last few years. Even egg prices are up 10% over the year as more people turn to eggs from meat.
 
These fast-growing prices are relatively new in the history of American food consumption. The price of beef was actually lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, when adjusted for inflation, for instance. But since 2010, the inflation-adjusted price has jumped 45%.
 
Weather events are partially to blame. Think polar vortex, drought, severe rainfall, more drought.
 
"A series of weather events have certainly been responsible for the price of perishables over the last five, six years," Volpe said. "From my perspective, it does seem the frequency has picked up over the last five years or so. There's always something going on - whether a drought, freeze or flood."
 
Before you start to panic, though, one positive note: Consumers in the U.S. still spend much less of their incomes on food than consumers in other countries. We spend about 11% of our income on food. Afghans spend about 50% of theirs on food, Volpe said.
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Not the target species, but I'm not complaining. The top-water hits are insane!

Not the target species, but I'm not complaining. The top-water hits are insane!
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Ticked Off


Claim:   Swabbing ticks with liquid soap is a recommended and effective method for removing them. 

FALSE

Example:   [Collected via e-mail, 2006] 

A School Nurse has written the info  enough to it really works!! 

"I had a pediatrician tell me what she believes is the best way to remove a tick. This is great, because it works in those places where it's some times difficult to get to with tweezers: between toes, in the middle of a head full of dark hair, etc. 

Apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball. Cover the tick with the soap-soaked cotton ball and swab it for a few seconds  the tick will come out on it's own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you lift it away.

This technique has worked every time I've used it (and that was frequently), and it's much less traumatic for the patient and easier for me.

Unless someone is allergic to soap, I can't see that this would be damaging in any way. I even had my doctor's wife call me for advice because she had one stuck to her back and she couldn't reach it with tweezers. She used this method and immediately called me back to say, 'It worked!'"
 

Origins:   In addition to their being repulsive-looking bugs that survive by latching onto warm-blooded victims to suck blood from them, there is another reason to regard ticks with horror: they can deliver a deadly payload of disease to those they are making a meal of. These arachnids 
feed by burrowing their heads into skin, a method that introduces their body fluids into their victims. If those fluids are disease-laden, those microbes will be passed to the ones being dined upon. However, it generally takes at least 12 to  of feeding before an infected tick can spread disease to its host, so speedy removal of these parasites is therefore key to avoiding tick-borne illness, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and Ehrlichia. 

Although the  reproduced above began circulating on the Internet in May 2006, the advice it attempts to impart is far older. Household lore is replete with tick removal suggestions that involve covering or coating the embedded arachnid with a substance it will find objectionable. Other long-lived suggestions for removing ticks include touching a lit match or hot needle to the tick's rear, swabbing the tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly, and tickling the tick's underside in an effort to persuade it to release its bite. 

However, those in the know about tick removal warn against these home remedies. Countermeasures of such nature don't always work to encourage ticks to detach from skin promptly (if at all), and even if such measures do seemingly aid the process of removing the critters, they may also make matters worse by stimulating the creatures to release additional saliva or regurgitate their gut contents, acts that increase the chance of their transmitting pathogens to their hosts. A 2006 journal article review of published literature on tick removal methods reported that:
One study compared several different techniques for removing ticks. Application of petroleum jelly, fingernail polish, 70% isopropyl alcohol, or a hot kitchen match failed to induce detachment of adult American dog ticks. 

Experimental evidence suggests that chemical irritants are ineffective at persuading ticks to detach, and risk triggering injection of salivary fluids and possible transmission of disease-causing microbes. In addition, suffocating ticks by smothering them with petroleum jelly is an ineffective method of killing them because they have such a low respiratory rate (only requiring  breaths per hour) that by the time they die, there may have been sufficient time for pathogens to be transmitted.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) advises:
Avoid folklore remedies such as "painting" the tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to make the tick detach from the skin. Your goal is to remove the tick as quickly as  wait for it to detach.
Similarly, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cautions:
If a tick is removed within 24 hours, the chances of it transmitting Lyme disease or other infections are much less. Use fine-point tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible. Pull gently. Avoid squeezing the body of the tick. Clean the site of the bite, your hands and the tweezers with disinfectant. You may want to wear protective gloves. 

You also may want to place the tick in a small container, like a pill container, and bring it to your vet for identification. Never use a burned match, petroleum jelly, or nail polish to try to remove ticks. These methods are ineffective.
A list of "DO NOTS" in a Medline Plus article about tick removal state:
Do NOT try to burn the tick with a match or other hot object. 
Do NOT twist the tick when pulling it out. 
Do NOT try to kill, smother, or lubricate the tick with oil, alcohol, vaseline, or similar material.
The recommended procedure for removing ticks is:
  • Grasp the tick close to its head or mouth with tweezers. Do not use your bare fingers. If needed, use a tissue or paper towel.

  • Pull it straight out with a slow and steady motion. Avoid squeezing or crushing the tick. Be careful not to leave the head embedded in the skin.

  • Clean the area thoroughly with soap and water. Also wash your hands thoroughly.

  • Save the tick in a jar and watch carefully for the next week or two for signs of Lyme disease.

  • If all parts of the tick cannot be removed, get medical help. Bring the tick in the jar to your doctor's appointment.
To reduce your chances of becoming a tick's dinner:
  • Avoid tick-prone areas whenever possible.

  • When in areas where ticks may be present, wear clothing that covers the arms and legs, with cuffs fastened and pants tucked into boots and socks.

  • Use a tick repellent that contains DEET and reapply it every  for maximum protection.
After any outdoor excursion into areas where ticks are commonly found, adults should check themselves and their children. Your four-legged friends should be checked for ticks too, because dogs and cats can also be felled by the diseases spread by these blood-sucking creatures. 

Barbara "keep the louse out of the house" Mikkelso

Read more at http://www.snopes.com/oldwives/tick.asp#kFKzXWBZzoIkchjF.99
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