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Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

July 15, 2014: SUBMERGED JETTY STRIKES AGAIN ... also pics and stuff

SUBMERGED JETTY STRIKES AGAIN: As you might have heard, another vessel got creamed by the submerged portion of the North Jetty. OK, technically it was the boat creaming the jetty.

The creamed 44-foot cabin cruiser definitely wasn’t cruising so well after hitting those below-water jetty stones. The vessel got fully hung-up on them. It began taking on water and soon hailed help on VHF Channel 16.  

To the rescue – and always to their credit – came the Coast Guard, State Marine Police and Sea Tow. Six adults were removed.

As noted, the vessel was thereafter feeling very poorly.  Since nobody was hurt, I can wise-assedly say, “I think it had stones.” 

For those who might not know, the North Jetty submerged rocks can range from being nearly out of the water (lowest tides) to being almost three feet down (high tides).

Now, let me see a show of hands from Barnegat Inlet regulars who have seen dozens and dozens of vessels unknowingly cruise over those potentially deadly submerged rocks. Dozens of hands going up, mine among them.

My buddy Walt, who faithfully anchors up and fishes those submerged rocks for blackfish, really sees the drama unfold – and dutifully yells and hand signals vessels steaming toward the hidden rocks. I’ve done it -- throwing up every sort of “Stop!” hand signal known to man. Many a captain will go by waving back just as eagerly, apparently thinking, “Geez, what friendly folks hang out near this inlet.”

I should mention that a huge number of clueless captains make it over the rocks, unscathed. Talk about dumb luck. If a wave just happens to be passing over the submerged jetty as a vessel, up on a plane, zips over, it’s straight into the inlet, Scott-free.  

I’ve radioed the lucksters who somehow cleared the rocks, unscathed. The captains are often so utterly clueless, they think you’re crazed. “I don’t know. There’s some nutcase on the radio says we just almost sunk ourselves. Maybe everyone’s not as friendly as those guys that were waving at us back there.”

I need to debunk the talk about a forthcoming capping of those North Jetty submerged rocks. The tons of work being done on the North Jetty this summer will NOT include such a capping.

One could easily launch into a “What are they thinking?!” declaration. However, I always take a Pepsi break before openly bitching and moaning about such potentially complex engineering things.

Down to just ice cubes, I’m harboring a sense that the hydrological dynamics of the entire inlet could be compromised by filling in that portion of the jetty. Just my luck, I stump for capping that area and damn if it doesn’t get done and the entrance to the inlet instantly turns into a hopeless sandbar. It’s off to West Virginia for me.

The feds have been pondering improvements to the marking of the North Jetty impact zone, using enhanced buoys and signage.

With today’s insanely advanced GPS, radar and communication systems, I’m betting it wouldn’t be overly hard to develop a radio alert system, which automatically activates onboard equipment as a vessel approaches the inlet. “Rocks ahead, numbnuts!” OK, maybe the language can be tweaked a bit. 

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Seafood Harvesters offer robust defense of Magnuson Act, urge Senate not to make harmful changes

SEAFOODNEWS.COM by John Sackton - July 15, 2014

The Seafood Harvesters of America is an umbrella group that has pulled together 14 regional fishing associations from different parts of the US to make sure that the voices of those who are successfully harvesting well managed stocks are heard in the Magnuson reauthorization.
 
At a conference in Washington DC, last month, they had the opportunity to present their ideas to NOAA and Congressional staffers. Chris Brown, a harvester from Rhode Island, is president of the group.
 
Chris said “The industry is in recognition that the Magnuson Act is working. The scope of the Act does not need to be expanded to continue moving in the right direction. ”
 
As a commercial fishermen, “there is one document that guides our actions: the Magnuson Act. We do not subscribe to the beliefs that there should be dissimilar standards between the commercial and recreational fishery."
 
In making comments about Magnuson, the Seafood Harvesters make these points:
 
"The Magnuson Stevens Act is working extraordinarily well and is a statute Americans should be proud of. In the 1980s and ‘90’s, many stocks around the Nation suffered significant declines. This resulted in untold job loss and severe economic harm to coastal communities across America. However, through considerable sacrifice on the part of the commercial fishing industry, significant progress has been made to rebuild overfished species and today they are the exception, not the rule. In 1999, NOAA listed 98 stocks as overfished; by 2012, only 40 stocks were overfished and 34 previously depleted fish stocks have been rebuilt. While there is still room for continued improvement, Harvesters are proud of the fact that 91% of U. S. fishery stocks are not experiencing overfishing. As previously mentioned, scientifically based fisheries management is the key to ensuring we continue this trend into the future. The stocks our members harvest are sustainably managed and we believe the Magnuson Stevens Act should be reauthorized with minimum overall changes to ensure we do not erode any of the progress commercial fishermen have made."
 
Seafood Harvesters of America urge the Subcommittee to limit the scope of MSA issues and recirculate an additional draft before final introduction.
 
On Bycatch:  "Changing language from developing “practical measures that minimize bycatch” to “practical measures to avoid$bycatch” raises concern and appears to be a major policy shift in the direction of the Act. Setting strict Congressional policy to avoid bycatch rather than minimize it at potentially all costs is not only impracticable to fishermen, but also could have serious consequence by reducing access to key fisheries that support healthy jobs and economies in our communities."
 
Innovative risk pools in the West Coast groundfish fishery allow fishermen to share data using advanced technologies that help to minimize bycatch of canary rockfish.
 
The language could undermine the basis for these types of cooperative efforts.
 
Another major issue that could destabilize investment in the commercial industry is the potential requirement for regional councils to revsit allocations between the recreational and commercial sector every five years.
 
“Requiring regional fishery management councils to revisit allocation every five years could create economic uncertainty for commercial fishermen and threaten their ability to obtain financing to reinvest in their businesses. For example, harvesters looking to upgrade or rebuild their aging vessels to be safer and more efficient may find bank loans difficult if not impossible to obtain if their lenders fear allocations will change prior to the full term of the loan. ”
 
Secondly, these allocation issues have been among the most difficult issues faced by the councils in some regions. For example, the negotiations over bringing recreational and charter fishing vessels into quota compliance on halibut took nearly five years. The current effort in the Gulf to ignore recreational fishing exceeding limits on red snapper, and to make up for this excess by taking fish away from the commercial sector and American dinner plates, is another example. The idea of mandating this review appears unworkable.
 
The Seafood Harvesters make a number of other recommendations, and hope that their views - representing those who actually make the law work, will prevail in the reauthorization.

Photo Credit: Seafood Harvesters

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Fishing L.B.I.

Fishing L.B.I.
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This northern puffer found his way into our seine this morning. We released the tiny guy unharmed. If you haven't made it to one of our seining programs yet there is still plenty of time and we always are surprised at what we see in our amazing Barnegat Bay.

Tomorrow we'll be at the Ocean County Library in Surf City at 10:30AM til 12PM with a puppet show and some arts and crafts using recycled items.

This northern puffer found his way into our seine this morning. We released the tiny guy unharmed. If you haven't made it to one of our seining programs yet there is still plenty of time and we always are surprised at what we see in our amazing Barnegat Bay. Tomorrow we'll be at the Ocean County Library in Surf City at 10:30AM til 12PM with a puppet show and some arts and crafts using recycled items.
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Cool photo:

Nick Handley

A few picks from our fishing trip yesterday. Found the fish on multiple occasions, but could get them to bite. Great day to be on the water, just wish the finned critters joined us in the fun : )

A few picks from our fishing trip yesterday. Found the fish on multiple occasions, but could get them to bite. Great day to be on the water, just wish the finned critters joined us in the fun : )

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Tony Stetzko added 4 new photos.

Had a great night fishing with Brian Werner... he fished all day today and still had enough to fish with me tonight... he started with Bobby Rice up P'Town way and slammmmed the Bass... then Fished with me tonight,,, took him on the hunt and showed him how to find Aggressive Bass...nice to fish with someone that likes the surf and can fish...all in all we found fish in three different bodies of water.. double headers and one fish ate the plug and dropper .. now that's aggressive

Tony Stetzko's photo.
Tony Stetzko's photo.
Tony Stetzko's photo.
Tony Stetzko's photo.

The other night while shark fishing, no sharks were to be had, however.....Wetboy & Aquaboy's friend John hooked onto this no tail ray

The other night while shark fishing, no sharks were to be had, however.....Wetboy & Aquaboy's friend John hooked onto this no tail ray
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Heres one of the 7 from last weekend 62 inch fish weight 115 bleed and gutted, fish was prob 130 caught in 20 fathoms.

Heres one of the 7 from last weekend 62 inch fish weight 115 bleed and gutted, fish was prob 130 caught in 20 fathoms.
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Mosquitoes Do Bite Some People More Than Others: Here Are The Traits Bloodsuckers Like

 @rpalmerscience
on July 19 2013 1:50 PM
West Nile virus is transmitted by mosquitoes. Wikimedia Commons

If you have type O blood and love enjoying a glass or two of beer on an outdoor porch, you may want to keep a lot of bug repellent handy. Scientists have found that mosquitoes find some kinds of blood sweeter than others.

In 1972, British scientists Corinne Wood and Caroline Dore first suggested that themosquito Anopheles gambiae was especially attracted to type O blood in research published in Nature. Wood and Dore exposed pairs of human volunteers with different blood types to 20 female mosquitoes (males don't suck blood). The mosquitoes, more often than not, zoomed in on the people with type O blood.

A 2004 paper published in the Journal of Medical Entomology by a group of Japanese researchers further examined the tastes. The scientists enlisted 64 people with different blood types who voluntarily exposed themselves to lots of female mosquitoes (thankfully for the study subjects -- but not the bugs -- the mosquitoes had their biting parts removed). People with type O blood were preferred over people with other types. But the real favorites of the bloodsuckers were people who had type O blood and whose skin secreted saccharides – little pieces of sugar.

The Straight Dope puts it succinctly: “if you're a type O secretor, to a mosquito you look like caramel-covered crack.”

Whatever your blood type, it also seems that mosquitoes are attracted to you if you’ve knocked back a few brews. A 2002 study from scientists at the Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University in Japan found that even just a 12-ounce cold one can make a person more delicious to mosquitoes. The exact reason why beer sweetens our taste to the bugs is still a mystery. The researchers thought that the amount of alcohol in a person’s sweat or the increase in skin temperature after drinking might be the explanation, but neither measurement proved to be a factor in how often mosquitoes went for a person.

Popular Science has examined the pressing question of whether a mosquito could get drunk by drinking your blood after you’ve pounded a few. While entomologists know that insects can get inebriated, the average mosquito blood meal from a person that’s been drinking contains very little alcohol.

“Before you try to drink a mosquito under the table, heed this warning from Michael Reiskind, an entomologist at Oklahoma State University: The blood alcohol levels required to do so would almost certainly kill you as well,” Bjorn Carey wrote for PopSci in August 2009.

Mosquitoes hone in on people primarily by smelling our breath – specifically, by detecting our exhaled carbon dioxide. The more carbon dioxide one emits, the more attractive you are. That’s why adults are more attractive to the bugs than children, and why pregnant ladies, who exhale more carbon dioxide, should take special care.

You probably have at least one friend who could walk through the most mosquito-infested swamp and come out with nary a single red bump. Some terribly lucky people make their own mosquito repellent. One such skin-derived compound being studied at Rothamsted Research in the U.K. is called 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, which smells like “toned-down nail polish remover,” the Wall Street Journal reported in 2009.

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Christian managed to stalk his first ever mirror koi. I love spending bank time with him and couldn't be more proud of him as a young angler.

Frank Likes Fishing's photo.
Frank Likes Fishing's photo.
Frank Likes Fishing's photo.
Frank Likes Fishing's photo.
Frank Likes Fishing's photo.

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