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Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

Wicked work day, helped dramatically by quick trips to the beach to view some of the coolest over-ocean cloud formations I’ve seen in many moons.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014: Wicked work day, helped dramatically by quick trips to the beach to view some of the coolest over-ocean cloud formations I’ve seen in many moons.

Quick vid look: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9Wa-Clt-tI&feature=youtu.be

When seeing such vaporous sky displays. I relate to one of the most classic LBI (Beach Haven) paintings of all time, “The Giant,” by N.C.Wyeth, depicting Island kids playing on the Queen City beach, with a highly original imaginary ogre in the background.

 As most folks know, through never-blinking social media, today’s towering clouds loosed wild weather, including a waterspout (videoed by Paul H.), along with ground-covering hail on mainland areas. The worst the Island got was a rumble of distant thunder.

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Fish be sayin', "Man, I musta sucked in some psychedelic phytoplankton or some s*** like that."  

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CLASSIC CHATTER: We finally got off the snide. A Classic-sized striped bass, over 34 inches, has been weighed in … breaking a bass drought which began, well, on Day One. This first striper came in on Day 16 on the eight-week contest. That might be some sorta slow-start record, but, as the saying goes, it’s a start. 

Winner: At 6:30 a.m., Tuesday, LBIFC member John Campbell weighed in a 23-3 bass, coming in at a lengthy 42 inches. Hopefully that fine hookup will open the floodgates to bass galore. Hell, I’d be happy if the gate opened to even a few stripers, spread evenly, here and there. 

Here's the read from Fisherman's HDQ: The First Segment of the 60th Annual closed on Sunday October 19th at 6pm with out a fish. We are now currently in the Second Segment, October 19th 6:01pm to November 2nd at 6pm. Finally this morning the first fish of the 2014 Derby was weighed in. Congrats to John Campbell of the LBI Fishing Club. He caught a 42" 23-lb 13-oz bass chunking bunker this morning on the north end of the Island.

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"Mom, Grammys on fire again."

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Sweet mugs!

Matt Burton

Some new mugs.

Some new mugs.

From: Capt. Alex [mailto:lhsportfishing@comcast.net]

Subject: Lighthouse Fishing Report 

Mother Nature continues to mess with our plans to get the fall run underway.  So if you can’t beat her join her J With the bay still 66 as well as the ocean, I set my crab pots one more time before season’s end.  I was not disappointed.  After a 10 hour soak I was rewarded with 15 FULL crabs (see attached photo).  I am always amazed how crabbing participation drops after the kids go back to school.  That’s OK, more for me. I worked the bay hard behind the inlet and up in the sedges Saturday morning with plugs, BKDs and live peanut bunker. Skunked.  Tide and sunrise were prime so a friend and I started fishing around 6 at the end of the flood and fished hard through most of the ebb.  The water was really dirty from the past weeks blows and groundswell.  Fishing should go from 0 to 60 any day now.

 

On the nature side: In the wild survival often depends on the conservation of energy. When I think of this and migratory fish I often make the comparison to migratory birds.  During migration, diurnal species of birds (those that are most active during the day) take advantage of the night to migrate.  In doing so, they can fly hundreds of miles at night without the fear of predation but use a lot of energy.  When the sun comes up they land, take cover, and actively feed so they can fatten up and continue their journey to the wintering grounds.  It is easier to find food with light and saves energy in feeding as compared to night.  Now stay with me here as I compare that to migratory striped bass.  Even though bass are well suited to hunt at night they often take advantage of daylight to actively feed more and in doing do not use as much energy as it take to feed at night.  Thereby, they can conserve energy needed to migrate.  I am not saying they don’t feed at night during the fall, but have you ever wondered why all out fall bass blitzes on peanut bunker or sandeels drops off as it gets dark?  Now comes night and the urge to continue migrating takes over.  By swimming as slow as 5 mph a bass can easily migrate 60 or more miles at once.  Now back to getting skunked…….  I am going to give it a try the next day because while I slept a body of striped bass may have just migrated to the waters around Barnegat Inlet and will be looking to feed with the rising sun.

Scream drags,

Capt. Alex

www.LighthouseSportfishing.com

Barnegat Bay, NJ

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It's shasta daisies time -- and I'm superbummed ... but not in a bad way. Its scientific name is Chrysanthemum superbum. Gospel truth. It's a member of the aster family. Its medicinal usages include fever reducer, anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, sedative.

It's shasta daisies time -- and I'm superbummed ... but not in a bad way. Its scientific name is Chrysanthemum superbum. Gospel truth. It's a member of the aster family. Its medicinal usages include fever reducer, anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, sedative.
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Well this house is certainly getting in the spirit of Year of the Salamander 2014!

Our St. Louis office got a call last week from a homeowner who had this pile of ringed salamanders trapped in an outside stairway. In autumn they travel by night to fishless woodland ponds where they may congregate by the hundreds for breeding. The salamanders were moved to a nearby fishless pond so they could continue. Learn more from our online Field Guide at <a href=http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/ringed-salamander. If you see activity like this, let us know so we can help wildlife get back on the right road. – Joe@MDC" width="356" height="394" />

Our St. Louis office got a call last week from a homeowner who had this pile of ringed salamanders trapped in an outside stairway. In autumn they travel by night. 

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Small but catching ,what a nice day
Small but catching ,what a nice day

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Hopefully a sign of luck !

Hopefully a sign of luck !

To help out this website, you can go to the top right side of this page and click on the blue "Donate" tab ... This goes to a PayPal account.  Otherwise, send donations to Jay Mann, 222 18th Street, Ship Bottom, NJ 08008.

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