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Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

Thursday, 07, 13: The beat goes on, meaning I’m still taking a beating when fishing. New Holgate videos ...

Now this looks like fun! That's what we should be doing with bass, damnit all. 

  • Saw about 100 of these caught today along the beaches of Buxton, NC. Hopefully they hang around for the Cape Hatteras Anglers Club tournament that starts tomorrow. ... via Greg Connell
    Saw about 100 of these caught today along the beaches of Buxton, NC. Hopefully they hang around for the Cape Hatteras Anglers Club tournament that starts tomorrow.

 I'm giving this a shot: 

Thursday, November 07, 2013: The beat goes on, meaning I’m still taking a beating when fishing. You know things are slow when I’ll wax poetic on a mere swipe or two I had taken at my jigged plastic tail. Even those hits seemed suspicious, striper-wise. They didn’t have much oomph and Tony C. told me he has recently caught sundials on his jigs.

I saw a small bass caught in Holgate on plug but also got a slew of skunk tales. Mark J. caught a couple weakfish while baitfishing the south end.

Arriving west winds might finally allow the bait to school up. Considering many falls have constant west winds, this year has been a fluke in that way also. However, I can’t blame the onshore winds we’ve been having for the lack of bass since ocean winds usually kick up bites in fall. The fish just aren’t in the house.

Dead sea turtle in North Beach, per call-in.

Also, dead sturgeon washed up on Barnegat Light beach. I’ll take corpse if no one wants it – though that is technically illegal. I hate to see it go to waste.

Here is video of "Dead Forest" area of Holgate. You can't get around it during higher tides. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKQXHX4-ItQ

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Pond formations near Holgate Rip: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AR3l8Ubfh9g

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Recent finding of a dead fawn washed up on BL beach was likely a DOA from the mainland that got caught up in the outflow from Double or Oyster creeks, drifted out the inlet then got blown ashore. With bow season going full guns, it’s mother might have been shot or it was weaned and left to survive on its own, then got chased into the water by coyotes and drowned. Coyotes are not big on swimming whereas mature deer are fairly water-worthy. Also, a deer in shallows has a deadly edge over attacking canine predators since it can still rear up on its back legs and come crushing down. Dead dog scenario.

 

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Bow hunting for deer is legal in all 50 states, but ethical hunters aim for the body

The state Division of Fish and Wildlife sent out a crew to the area looking for the deer, and spokesman Bob Considine said the department would tranquilize the animal in the hopes of removing the arrow.

Ms Darrah said they told her to call them as soon as the deer reappeared in her back garden and they would try to catch it. 

Her efforts to help the animal were applauded by her friends on Facebook after she posted the image, taken from her back fence, and many of them expressed their sadness at deer's plight.

She posted on her Facebook page: 'I've been on "deer watch" since just before 5am. I have NJ Fish and Wildlife alerted. 

'I am also sure this was not done intentionally. Any hunters I know would have looked for this deer knowing they missed a clean shot. In addition to that, all the hunters I know, hunt for food.'


Deer are attracted to her large property thanks to a big pear tree and its location next to the Split Rock Reservoir.

'I know a lot of hunters and I know that was nothing done intentionally,' Ms Darrah told her local paper. 'I'm sure if any hunter saw him, they would have been kind of enough to put him down.'

Ms Darrah spoke to a Fish and Wildlife representative and followed their advice to put out a supply of corn for the deer, which appeared to be travelling in a herd with four others.

Bow hunting for deer is legal in all 50 states, but ethical hunters aim for the body

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Is this the most terrifying sea creature ever caught? Mystery species with fearsome tusk-like spikes and spines along its body is found off Borneo

  • Foot-long creature has baffled authorities who are scrabbling to identify it 
  • It has a large head and a spiny body that gets smaller towards the tail
  • Was pulled from the South China Sea by an angler near Tudan in Malaysia

A mystery fish with terrifying tusk-like spikes near its mouth and spines along its body has been caught off the coast of Borneo.

The discovery has baffled fisherman in the area and the authorities are also scrabbling to identify the foot-long species.

Locals have temporarily named it the Armour Fish, courtesy of its sharp spines on the top and bottom of its body, which gets progressively smaller towards the tail.

Anyone for supper? This frightening fish, complete with tusk-like spikes and spines along its body has been caught in the South China Sea off Borneo

Anyone for supper? This frightening fish, complete with tusk-like spikes and spines along its body has been caught in the South China Sea off Borneo

Who's NOT a pretty boy, then? The Protected Areas and Biodiversity Conservation Division of Sarawak Forestry Corporation is currently looking into identifying the creature

Who's NOT a pretty boy, then? The Protected Areas and Biodiversity Conservation Division of Sarawak Forestry Corporation is currently looking into identifying the creature

Angler Sapar Mansor, 43, from Taman Ceria, Permyjaya, caught the fish in the South China Sea near Tudan, Malaysia.

He told the Borneo Post: 'This is the first time in my life that I have seen this type of fish. I brought it home to my wife and informed her of the rare catch.

 Sapar said he and a friend went out in a fishing boat and travelled two hours from Miri River to the sea.

They started fishing at around 5am and landed his surprising catch about an hour after arriving at a location many miles from Miri.

Brave: Siti Kadariah, the wife of the angler who caught the fish, and their daughter with the creature at home. They have temporarily named it the Armour Fish thanks to its sharp spines

Brave: Siti Kadariah, the wife of the angler who caught the fish, and their daughter with the creature at home. They have temporarily named it the Armour Fish thanks to its sharp spines

The Protected Areas and Biodiversity Conservation Division of Sarawak Forestry Corporation (SFC) is currently looking into identifying the creature.

Oswald Braken Tisen, the deputy general manager, said: 'SFC has not been able to established what kind of fish it is but is in the process of checking with relevant authorities.'

Sapar's wife Siti Kadariah and his children have taken to calling the creature 'Armour Fish' for now thanks to its sharp spines.

Siti, 35, added: 'My husband caught this rare species and I was surprised to see the fish.

'When my husband brought the fish home, both my children were stunned because of its shape and uniqueness.'

Siti has decided to dry the fish so that it can be preserved and kept at their home.

'It is God's gift and I and my family will keep the fish,' she added.

“We make you bery happy, marine….”

[Vietnam News Brief Service]  Nov 7, 2103

 (c) 2013 Toan Viet Limited Company. All rights reserved.

The U.S. has surpassed Japan to become the biggest importer of shrimp products from Vietnam, with the purchased value of $542.7 million in the first nine months this year, said Vietnam’s General Department of Customs. 

The figure represented a year-on-year jump of 62.6%, the government agency said, adding that export prices of Vietnamese shrimp product rose by $3.2-$4 a kilogram. 

Japan, the second largest importer of Vietnamese shrimp, spent $497.1 million on buying the commodity from the Southeast Asian nation in Jan-Sept, up 12.8% on year. 

Vietnam’s revenues from shrimp export to the EU increased by 14.8% to $263.6 million during the same period, the customs said.

 Shrimp is among Vietnam’s export staples. In 2013, the country is predicted to earn $2.6 billion from shrimp export, up from $2 billion last year.

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Ain’t no debris coming our way?

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS [CBS] - November 7, 2013 - 

Responding to recent news reports that an island of debris from the 2011 Japan tsunami in the Pacific Ocean that is about the size of Texas is heading straight to the United States, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said that it is not the case.

From a post that was published Tuesday, the NOAA's Marine Debris blog clarified: "There is no solid mass of debris from Japan heading to the United States."

It further added: "At this point, nearly three years after the earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, whatever debris remains floating is very spread out. It is spread out so much that you could fly a plane over the Pacific Ocean and not see any debris since it is spread over a huge area, and most of the debris is small, hard-to-see objects."

The NOAA acknowledged that while there is still some debris in the sea, it is uncertain of where the debris is located and how much is left since the North Pacific is vast.

"A significant amount of debris has already arrived on U.S. and Canadian shores," it said, "and it will likely continue arriving in the same scattered way over the next several years. As we get further into the fall and winter storm season, NOAA and partners are expecting to see more debris coming ashore in North America, including tsunami debris mixed in with the "normal" marine debris that we see every year."

Back in September 2012, a large plastic bin was the first confirmed piece of marine debris from the Japan tsunamis to arrive in Hawaii, the NOAA had said. Japanese consular officials confirmed that the blue bin found floating in the ocean is from Fukushima, said Ben Sherman, a NOAA spokesman in Washington, D.C. The bin was spotted off Waimanalo, on the southeast coast of Oahu, by Makai Ocean Engineering staff and was retrieved by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory. Used for transporting seafood, the 4-by-4-foot cube bears the name Y.K. Suisan Co. Ltd., the state Department of Land and Natural Resources said.

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The folks who swore that restricting commercial bunkering in state waters would ruin them …

Omega Protein reports record Q3 sales and gross profit

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS [Seafoodnews.com] - November 7, 2013 - 

For the third quarter, Omega Protein reported revenue of $87.6 million, compared to $84.0 million year ago and $41.8 million in the second quarter of 2013

Gross profit margin was 33.6% for the quarter, an increase from 16.0% in the same period a year ago and 31.8% in the second quarter of 2013

Net income of $14.0 million for the quarter, compared to $0.2 million in the same period a year ago and $4.0 million in the second quarter of 2013
Earnings:  Earnings per diluted share of $0.66 for the quarter, compared to $0.01 in the same period a year ago and $0.19 in the second quarter of 2013

Adjusted EBITDA was $27.1 million for the quarter, compared to $11.6 million in the same period a year ago and $11.8 million in the second quarter of 2013

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Asian carp DNA detected in Lake Michigan

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS  [Associated Press]  by   JOHN FLESHER (AP Environmental Writer)  Nov 7, 2013

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. - (AP) -- A water sample from Lake Michigan's Sturgeon Bay in Wisconsin has tested positive for DNA from invasive Asian carp, although it's unknown whether the genetic material came from a live fish, scientists said Tuesday.

It's the second positive DNA hit for the feared carp detected in Lake Michigan in recent years, as experts work to determine how far the voracious fish have advanced toward the Great Lakes. A water sample taken in 2010 from the lake's Calumet Harbor also yielded a positive result.

 

Four types of Asian carp imported decades ago have escaped into the wild and migrated northward in the Mississippi River and many of its tributaries. Of particular concern are bighead and silver carp, which gobble huge amounts of plankton -- microscopic plants and animals that are essential for aquatic food chains. Scientists fear if they reach the Great Lakes, they could out-compete native species and threaten a fishing industry valued at $7 billion.

 An electric barrier in a shipping canal 37 miles from Chicago is meant to block their path toward Lake Michigan. Just one live Asian carp has been found beyond that point, although numerous DNA samples have turned up past the barrier and in Lake Erie.

 

Scientists say fish DNA is found in mucus, scales and bodily wastes they discharge. But some say there could be other sources, such as droppings of birds that have eaten the fish, so it isn't certain that the Sturgeon Bay discovery signals the presence of live Asian carp, much less a breeding population. "It's hard to know what to make of it," said Mike Staggs, director of fisheries management with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. 

The samples were collected and analyzed by researchers with the University of Notre Dame, Central Michigan University and The Nature Conservancy as part of a broader Great Lakes fish survey. Fifty samples were taken from Sturgeon Bay in May, but the finding that one carried silver carp DNA was confirmed only last week. 

The Wisconsin DNR and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will take more samples from the area in hopes of determining whether the positive hit was a fluke or something worse. 

"One sample is a smoke detector," said Chris Jerde, a Notre Dame biologist. "A couple of more samples is a fire." 

It's too early to be alarmed, but the finding is "an interesting development that we need to research further," said Brian Elkington, a deputy supervisor with the Fish and Wildlife Service regional office in Minneapolis. 

Sen. Debbie Stabenow, a Michigan Democrat, said the result underscores the need for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to expedite proposals for permanently shielding the Great Lakes from Asian carp. The Corps is wrapping up a report scheduled for release early next year.

 "These fish could destroy the Great Lakes ecosystem, as well as boating and fishing industries and hundreds of thousands of jobs," Stabenow said.

 

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Wild cranberries still harvestable due to lack of super-cold nights. 

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