jaymanntoday

Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

Monday, October 17, 2016: I’m likely being a bit overly dramatic by saying bassing is busting out all over ...



I'm guessing the old "No! ... Bad boy!" isn't overly effective in this situation ... 

Monday, October 17, 2016: I’m likely being a bit overly dramatic by saying bassing is busting out all over but it had been so slow that getting a slew of striper reports from both boat and beaches constitutes a dang-decent upturn, egged on by water now down into the mid- to lower-60s.

“Here's a Walt P. boat reports: Had some success this AM on the north jetty. Four bass, one keeper, the others just under. Fished spot which seemed to be the ticket. Four other boats throwing artificials and did not see any takes. Ocean off of IBSP was 65.  WP”

The beach bass take remains very rogue-ish, as in one-and-done, though I heard of half a dozen cow-grade bass from the surf, overall -- all but one taken on bait. Need I repeat that a 30-pound-grade bass was caught on a bucktail. I’d like to get more details … Mark J. Milovsky. Jmann99@hotmail.com.

Beach overwash has become an even wider-ranging problem, due to swells coupled with full moon. Below is a video showing one way to fish the overwash zone, i.e. at a distance. Circle hooks come in handy. Brant Beach is very tricky driving at high tide.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5QSs1a8xG7Y&feature=youtu.be

Small bluefish just won’t grow up. A one-pounder looks huge compared to the 8-ouncers ripping bait apart both in the surf and also in the bay. Ship Bottom bayside is loaded with small blues, fishing pier and the like.  These small blues are so small that the filets are too thin for smoking.

Why haven’t you signed up for the Classic yet?! I can tell by the sign-up list that many of you are dilly-dallying. The heart of the contest is yet to come so now is the ideal time to climb aboard. I’ll note for the umpteenth time that your participation keeps this LBI traditions alive … and there are very few such longtime traditions left. There was already a case of a bass worth a load of money and prizes losing out because the angler hadn’t signed up.

2016 62nd Annual LBI Surf Fishing Classic

Oct. 8 - Dec. 4, 2016


Live Results

I had written about this oddly mild weather last week. I based my forecast on a lack of systems more than a powerful system driving up mild air. We just aren’t feeling the northern jet steams yet, meaning there is a bit of a void, almost a vacuum, coming into play in the Midwest, warming up that zone. I sometimes hear it called a bubble of mild air but it’s a lot more complex than that. We get it as it moves east. While here on LBI we won’t be baking like the mainland will, the quite-mild upper 70s will prevail. Next week looks normalish but I also see another odd touch of mildness possible – though only a bit above normal.

Oddly, this type of fall weather usually drives deer hunters nuts but I’m seeing some fine takes. Along with the rut, another excellent acorn drop is keeping deer on established pathways to the eats. That makes for reliable sites to place stands.

A bunch of my Facebook “friends” have recently been showing so-called “straightened” hooks, leading to lost fish. That “straightened” part is a bit overstated since, at most, the hook is just bent outward a modest amount. Since most hooks are made solidly, a hook bending outward is usually a drag – literally.

I’m as prayerful as the next guy when fighting a big fish. I begin with the initial “Just let me get a glance at it … then I won’t care if it gets off.” That is soon followed by, “OK, just let me get it into the shorebreak, then it won’t be so bad if I lose it.” Finally, “Just let me get it onto the wet sand … and then it can throw the hook.” Gotcha!

All those steps require patience – and pleading. Get too muscular and you’ll get to find out if you really didn’t mind if it gets off -- thanks to a bent hook from too much pull or too much drag. I'll exclude barracuda and slammer blue fishermen since a shaking head from those grinders, even on a light drag, can "open" a hook. 

Weirdest parallel ever. I used to regularly drive across the country. And it seemed that every time I looked down, I was so low on fuel that the “Low Fuel” warning light was blazing. Making things hotter still, roadside signs indicated gas was a goodly distance ahead. With the warning light blinking, “You’re down to fumes, dude!” I had to contend with that famed fuel strategy: Do I slow down to conserve fuel – but take that much longer to reach the gas – or, do I speed up and burn more fuel but cover more ground rushing to the pumps!?

Let’s just say I learned the lead-foot way … and soon began routinely carrying a couple spare gallons of gas.

Now back to the monster bass on the line. While it would seem a slow haul-in would mean a greater chance of running out of luck, it’s actually the pedal-to-the-metal approach that leaves you high, dry and fishless in the long run. Hey, I told you it was a weird parallel. 

Below: Even this tiny bend means a lost fish. 

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Surfcasting update: 

Beach Project Coming - October 2016 

BEACH PROJECT NEWS
    

 October 14, 2016, Harvey Cedars was informed that beach replenishment will begin in the Borough within the next 7 to 10 days.  This project will restore the dunes and replenish 100’ of flat beach from Cumberland Avenue to 78th Street.  Hudson Avenue will be the access point for the contractor, Great Lakes, and the ocean pipeline connection will be at Atlantic.  The Hudson Avenue dune will be leveled for the length of the project for access and will be rebuilt at the end of the project.
 
After mobilization at Hudson, pumping of sand will begin at Atlantic and continue north to 78th Street.  Thereafter, the project will switch south and continue to Cumberland. It is anticipated the contractor will start on October 22nd and will complete the project in approximately 9 days, weather dependent. 
 
On Monday, October 17, Public Works will begin removing all fencing on the beach and walkovers.  Public Works will replace the walkover post & rail fencing (including private walkovers) after the beach project is completed.  Dune fencing will be replaced by Public Works in the spring by May 15th.  Hard pack on walkovers will not be replaced at this point but the hard pack (I5) on the Hudson Avenue drive-over will also be replaced by Public Works after the project.

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What sinkers can do ... 

Aaron Beshears's photo.
Aaron Beshears's photo.
Aaron Beshears's photo.

... Accidents happen in this sport. Fortunately, Dan was wearing sun glasses. Unfortunately, the glasses shattered and left over 100 pieces of metallic in the eyeball. Fortunately, a local angler (Brice)who is a paramedic was watching the pro angler fish. He observed the accident and immediately rendered medical help. Dan was flown to one of the best eye hospitals in the country in Birmingham, Alabama. He has underwent surgery and will have a couple more to go but the prognosis is much better than we initially thought. He "may " lose some movement of the eye and a little vision but he's not going to lose his eye. I couldn't help but stop by on my way home and visit with him. He's getting released today and will be a resident of Birmingham for about a week or so but he will be in the deer woods very soon. The Major League Fishing crew and staff are a very tight knit group. A family. Thanks for everyone's thoughts and prayers! Also a quick for the angler, he is blaming himself. MLF Rocks!

Also: via http://www.fieldandstream.com/

"... A Long Island, New York, angler who managed to kill himself a few days ago with his own sinker. According to this article in Newsday, Jaime Chicas, 21, somehow hit himself right above the nose with a 3-ounce sinker while fishing off an area jetty. The weight penetrated the front of his skull and blasted through his brain before stopping.

The article doesn’t say precisely how this happened, but my guess is that his sinker became lodged on a nearby rock. While thrashing with his rod and pulling hard on the line, apparently the sinker came suddenly loose and was propelled by rod and line with huge velocity right at his face."

Lighthouse Sportfishing Report
Yesterday, 9:00 PM
Capt. Alex (lhsportfishing@comcast.net)

Saturday morning started with pre-dawn smoke on the water. When you see this it actually water at the surface vaporizing. With air temps  in the low 40’s and bay temps in the low to mid 60’s the water was losing heat, giving up to the air in the form of a vapor. Pretty cool. This weekend unofficially kicked off my fall bass season, and if Saturday morning’s bite is any indication of the fall run we should have some great action coming up. It’s been 7 weeks since I messed up my foot and ankle. Seven weeks of not fishing, but that is in the past. Saturday morning I hopped on (get it ;) ) my friend Capt. Dan’s boat. Before we left he tried to net bait and on one throw he brought up about 2 dozen brown shrimp (photo attached).  These large shrimp, 7”-9”, including their very long antennae, can be found from Martha’s Vineyard down to the Gulf Coast States. In one part of Florida they are commercially valuable worth 100s of millions of dollars a year. On our 2 hour inside tip we landed 8 bass, seven of which were 28”-29”. All on plugs or Bass Candy Delights. Several times we witnessed mullet getting chased trying to escape from bass. Sunday morning I was back at the helm of the Debbie M looking for bass. The bite was a little slower with only one short bass falling to an artificial. Switching over to live bait we landed for keepers and two 4-5 pound blues before the crowds got crazy. Still have a few dates open so give a call if you want to have some fun fishing light tackle. 

Screaming drags,

 

Capt. Alex

www.LighthouseSportfishing.com

Barnegat Bay, NJ

 609-548-2511

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Lighthouse Sportfishing

Lighthouse Sportfishing
13 hrs ·This weekend unofficially kicked off my fall bass season, and if Saturday morning’s bite is any indication of the fall run we should have some great action coming up. It’s been 7 weeks since I messed up my foot and ankle. Seven weeks of not fishing, but that is in the past. Saturday morning I hopped on (get it ;) ) my friend Capt. Dan’s boat. On our 2 hour inside trip we landed 8 bass, seven of which were 28”-29”. All on plugs or Bass Candy Delights. Several times we witnessed mullet getting chased trying to escape from bass. Sunday morning I was back at the helm of the Debbie M looking for bass. The bite was a little slower with only one short bass falling to an artificial. Switching over to live bait we landed four keepers and two 4-5 pound blues before the crowds got crazy. Still have a few dates open so give a call if you want to have some fun fishing light tackle.

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For www.jaymanntoday.ning.com

This is my one yearly reach-out for donations to keep this website/blog up and running. Expenses to keep it up and running do mount by year’s end. Any contribution is not only appreciated but is strictly applied to the site.

Checks can be sent to: Jay Mann, 222 18th Street, Ship Bottom, NJ, 08008

OR:

PayPal jmann99@hotmail.com

Also, a huge thanks to the tons of folks who have helped with the blog this entire year.

 

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Tracie Lynn Scherer

Butterfly landed on my nose lol lol
 — with Gina Adragna.

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Pretty good blitz this am with fish in the 26 to 30" range. Perfect flyrod fish. But damn man... these albies. Anyone else notice how much more finicky they are this year?
 

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Nearby waters ...
50 an half pounder on the milling around

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Jay Mann
 shared 
William G Saul
's 
post
.


Nearly two years after a privately built Antares rocket crashed and exploded, the booster's builder Orbital ATK is ready to return to flight tonight (Oct. 16) from Wallops…
SPACE.COM
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(Our infatuation with health suppliments could be killing the krill population)  

World's Krill Harvesters to Discuss Commercial Catch Limits as Supplement Industry Drives Demand


SEAFOODNEWS.COM [Financial Review] by Patrick Durkin - October 17, 2016

Krill may be smaller than your pinky finger, swimming among the vast Antarctic waters of the Southern Ocean but the "pink gold" is the new superstar of the $US30 billion supplements industry driving Australian companies like Blackmores, Swisse Vitamins and Pharmacare's Nature's Way, as the ageing population juices up on omega-3 and fish oil to stave off disease.

Twenty five countries including Australia, Russia and China will join leading krill harvesters in Hobart this week to renegotiate the rules of the game for catch limits and harvest zones as environmental groups step up their campaign to protect the small, shrimp-like crustacean which lives in large schools known as swarms of up to 30,000 off Australia's southern doorstep.

US studies claim that Omega-3 deficiency kills more people each year than breast cancer and the supplement can tackle heart, brain and eye health, as well as immunity and inflammatory issues. While krill oil contains less omega-3 than fish oil, it is thought to be more easily absorbed and avoids any "fishy" aftertaste. The "krill craze" has triggered triple digit sales growth since 2012 and $200 million in Australian sales each year as celebrities like Jennifer Aniston spruik the benefits.

"People generally have way too low Omega-3 levels," said Cilia Indahl, sustainability director for Norway's Aker BioMarine, the world's largest krill harvester which supplies a number of Australian companies including Blackmores. "You have to eat fatty fish three times a week but not all fatty fish has the good Omga-3s that you want, so most of us need a supplement," she tells AFR Weekend in Melbourne on her way to the pow-wow in Hobart.

The popularity of the $US3 billion Omega-3 fatty acid market has driven a boom in the annual krill catch which has tripled from the 1990s to close to 300,000 tonnes each year with plans by China and Russia for massive expansion. Environmental groups claim penguins, seals and whales in the Southern Ocean are being threatened by the declining krill population which is being accelerated by melting Antarctic sea ice.

New Gold Rush

Ms Indahl admits the "krill craze" has triggered something of a "gold rush" but said the harsh Antarctic conditions meant only the most dedicated fisheries have survived.

"When krill fisheries started to catch on, there was a lot of interest in it, it was looked upon as a new sort of gold mine, it is a high value product but a lot of people tried and didn't succeed, so we are seeing more countries give up because it is such a harsh environment, the weather down there makes it very difficult to achieve at a financially viable scale. I think the only reason we have managed is we have put in a lot of investment into sustainable fishing technology," Ms Indahl said.

There is an increasing push by companies and consumers for greater transparency around sustainable fishing practices with environmental groups complaining the "highly-efficient krill fishing vessels vacuum the ocean for krill and process it onboard".

Blackmores wasn't prepared to offer a Krill Oil product until it had sent its Quality & Sourcing Manager on a two-week voyage with Aker BioMarine to observe their fishing practices first hand. Eleven companies currently hold quotas to fish krill and six are part of the organisation for responsible fishing.

"It's our biggest challenge. It's the thing that keeps me awake at night," Blackmores CEO Christine Holgate has said about their supply chains.

Ms Indahl said the total fishing limit for krill is set at 1 per cent of their total biomass, compared with 10 per cent for other fish species which is considered a "highly precautionary" safeguard. The big debate over the next fortnight will be around which areas are fished and the push by environmental groups for no-take zones.

"In the Antarctic there are four areas of krill fisheries along the peninsula," she said. "In the four areas you have percentages of how much you can take from each area, so the second safety net [beyond catch limits] is to make sure the fishing is not concentrated in one area, so it is spread around the total fishing area which is twice the size of the US," Ms Indahl said. "That second safety net goes on for two or four years at a time and it expires now so it has to be renewed, that is one of the concerns this year. The other question is on marine protected areas, leaving some areas as no take areas to leave a reference point for researchers," she said.

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