jaymanntoday

Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

Monday, October 01, 2012: Nice goes on; Classicize early;

 

Its stargazing time again. How'd I miss this one?" Photo: Chris Huch, via FB.  

Monday, October 01, 2012: It’s as if October wants to take on September for beautyosity. What a day. I’m semi-stuck at work but I’m busting out early – I’ll hit the office after dark to round out my 10-hour day. It sure will help to have the LBI traffic signals on the blink cycle. Enjoy the easier Boulevard cruise but remember that Ship Bottom keeps a few traffic signals on year’round. Also, don’t get going too freely and speedily when going through the Beach Haven 25 mph school zone.  The boys in blue hang there and you sure as hell don’t want a “speeding a school zone” ticket, fine and points. Brutal.

 

I might have some new stories to share later today. Check back.

 

I’d like to hit you with a blog sector based on my upcoming weekly offering. It’s an effort to motivate anglers to sign up for the Classic a bit early. (Please ignore any typos in this rough copy …)

 

WELCOME TO THE POST: The Island is on the blink. Traffic signals are now flashing in a shade known as off-season yellow.

We’ve moved into what might be called Phase One of off-season quietude. The high-energy wackiness of the young guns – kids to collegians – has drifted off to shine in classroom climes. Families are familying back home. Workers are anchored to their oft distant jobs, many needing to pay back “off” days they finagled to fluke fish during the summer. 

However, not everyone is gone with the west winds. Surfers remain at the ready for autumnal swells. Back-home summerites eagerly await their warrior weekends; great flocks of snowbirds still hang around for the holidays. Most importantly, surf anglers are poised to swarm the sudsline for the eight-week Long Beach Island Surf Fishing Classic. It starts this Saturday.

Speaking of the imminent Classic, time is running out to be an earlier entrant. Get crackin’.

Even if you wait until the last possible instant to climb aboard this year’s surf fishing tourney, you’ll still be as qualified as everyone else to cash in on the event’s fame and fortune.

CLASSIC CALL: My fishing forecast for the Classic remains unchanged: A slow to very slow start, with rogue entry-level fish – a weigh-in here, a weigh-in there.

The big fish, I’m talking mainly bass, aren’t far off. But, they’re not right here, right now. That not the worst thing for the event’s kick-off. It levels the fishing field. Each and every entrant can be the one to land a singular weigh-worthy bass -- and then watch it rack up some serious winnings. It actually gets tougher to make a leaderboard mark when the fishing is fast and furious.

As hinted at above, the first of the season’s big bass could be leaking into our beachside waters during the Classic’s first week. The bigger push of linesiders – and possibly the event’s largest stripers -- will be later in October.

Bluefish are a whole other arrival matter. The arrival of the choppers has become an unpredictable waiting game. In fact, the autumnal slammer appearance might very well be one of those micro-indicators of a rapidly warming ocean.

Back in the day, bluefish would be hitting the tourney scales from “Day One” onward. Of course, water temps would be in the upper 50s. Nowadays, we might not be seeing a serious flow of slammers until the last segment of the contest. Kinda weird.

But back to those early-arriving bass. While I’d love to think they’ll be jonseing to pounce on one of my beloved plugs, I can just about guarantee they’ll all be bait-caught fish.

When bait fishing, some serious fishing strategy can step up to bat. Along with always using the freshest possible bunker chunks (I believe female bunker with orange roe have more drawing power), I’ll admit that some of the largest bass go for the entire head of a fresh bunker.

Chunking outside the box, kingfish heads are known to be fabulous bait for big fish, mainly drum to our south.

Then there’s swimming outside the bait box. I’m bringing this up as a way to (hopefully) motivate even Classic newbies to get creative – and highly competitive.

For weeks to come, there will be a smorgasbord of baitfish in out waters, all just begging to be live-lined. Net or buy a spot (croaker) to throw into the suds and you’re offering a bass arguably its favorite foodstuff. The Same thinking: Snag (foul-hook) a live bunker, then rehook it to “swim.” It’s an open invite to the biggest and baddest bass on the block. Fishing tiny plastic grub jigs to nab an ocean herring offers a chance to then liveline a prime target of bigger stripers. You get my live-lining drift.

By the by, livelining uses some of the simpliest rigs imaginable, but, you gotta have just the right hooks and leaders. Ask at the shops for “livelining” hooks, which are short-shanked and kinda thick.

I fully believe in circle hooks when live-lining, though many/most of the best anglers prefer extra-strength bait hooks – so they can drive the hook home with enough force to pull the fish’s head clean off its body.

 

 

 

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EX-POST EMAIL: “Hey Jay, writing in a bit late on this one but I wanted to share my experience with that beach wedding you encountered down in Loveladies on sat Sept. 15th. 

 “First time with the buggy pass for me this year so I figured to give my first crack on the relatively wide and deserted beaches in Loveladies. Pulled up, aired down and drove on. Bunch of oldtimers were screaming "can't drive on the beach" so I slowed down and showed them the permits...still unhappy so I moved on. Picked bluefish all day long fishing roughly a miles from the nearest person. A near perfect day on the beach!
 “I left at 5 pm, and as you know the only ramp in Loveladies is Coast Ave. The wedding was already set up at the bottom of the ramp with beachgoers all around also.  
 “Long story short, a big yellow Toyota fj cruiser may be in the background of some of their wedding pictures stuck on the ramp up because they couldn't give me any space to gain the speed needed to get up and over.  
 “They had permits but so did I.. who's right here.? I would have gladly went up to a different access ramp, but I didn't want to get popped for driving in Harvey Cedars without their permit or Barnegat Light, where no buggying, is allowed.  
 Who is the genius who permitted them for that day on that beach?  Love the blog and read it everyday, good stuff! Brendan N.”

 

(Boy, I'm feelin' ya, Brendan.  

For the sake of the newlyweds, I didn't want to bring up what you have so concisely depicted.

I, too, ran into so much attitude I would have jumped out in any other situation but a wedding.

I hadn't even reached the beach when people walking up the street began asking, unsweetly, "Where the hell are you going?" My answer only elicited a "You can't. We're having a wedding there." 

As for who could enter: You were obviously totally in the right.

Having a load of buggying time under my belt, I knew full-well it would be a sure bog down leaving that beach because of an inability to get a head of steam going up the “ramp.” Sorry, it was you. (Any pics? Just kidding).

My being a “good guy” that day also came with my hesitation about driving off in Harvey Cedars. I instead painstakingly turned my full-sized truck around. What a headache that was. You saw how the illegal parkers had all but blocked the road. 

Still, I couldn't let the actions of some wise-asses trump the upbeatness of kids getting hitched. And, it seems, you were trying to be equally polite --- though also equally bothered. 

I will get word about the user conflict to LBT.  J-mann)

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Viking Village 40' Mural - Artist David Kaltenbach touching up his work from a few years ago. The mural is used for our educational and informative 'Dock Tours.'

 

 

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St. john's Telegram]  by James McLeod  Oct 1, 2012

The seal tannery is bustling on a sunny September morning, as workers handle large stacks of pelts in various stages of processing.

The work here continues year-round as workers tan and dye the tens of thousands of seal skins that were harvested this spring on the sea ice around Newfoundland.

“This is a production facility more like Terra Nova Shoes than a fish plant,” Carino Processing Ltd. CEO Dion Dakins says as he takes The Telegram on an exclusive tour of the facility.

It’s steady work, and it employs around 25 people full time in the community of Dildo. The people in the plant are happy for the work and the contribution to the local economy.

“Lot of caring people; good outport people,” says worker Tony Johnson as he walks by.

It’s labour-intensive too, he says.

The pelts get tossed in sawdust, soaked in brine, treated with tanning chemicals, shaved, dried, dyed and then examined and graded before they’re ultimately sold and shipped to market.

But the whole works of it exists on a precarious position; Dakins says matter-of-factly that if the company hadn’t received a loan from the provincial government this spring, the plant wouldn’t be operating this year.

That would likely have been disasterous for the province’s seal industry; minimum processing requirements forbid the shipping out of raw pelts, and the Carino facility is the only tannery currently operating in the province.

“In 2006 we had five tanneries operating in Newfoundland and Labrador on seal products employing the same number of people in five communities around Newfoundland and Labrador,” Dakins says. “This industry will be successful when that many tanneries or more are operating again in Newfoundland and Labrador. That will be true success — taking the available quota based on sound science.”

Right now, that goal is a long way away. The hunt this year was fairly successful, but harvesters still only took a fraction of the total quota set by DFO.

And while Dakins is at great pains to make it clear that the provincial government loan was not a subsidy — it bears interest, and the terms of the loan require repayment — he also wouldn’t be in business without it.

Workers are very much aware of the political position of the seal hunt. They keep track of the Russian seal ban, and ongoing issues in the European Union.

“We hang in here,” says Wayde George, who’s been working in the industry for more than 30 years. “We have ups and downs. … I just hope it’s going to keep going the same.”

Animal rights groups like the Humane Society International and the International Fund for Animal Welfare have painted the government loan as a subsidy to the industry. Workers at the plant are very aware of the loan, and thankful for it.

But Dakins says the subsidy label has been a major problem for him in other parts of the world; it makes it more difficult to sell the pelts at market value.

In nearly every aspect of the tannery, the politically charged position of the seal hunt lurks.

Some of the pelts get dyed a light silvery “polar” colour, dilute enough that you can still see the animal’s spots. That product is very popular with many Newfoundlanders, who are proud to wear seal products.

But many, many more pelts get dyed dark brown or black. Those are more popular internationally, and they’re often used for hats and the trim on coats as a cheaper fur that’s comparable to mink.

When asked where they’re selling the pelts, Dakins flatly refuses to say.

“It’s been a standard thing within the industry, we’re not divulging our markets anymore,” he says. “What we don’t want to do is give animal rights groups the opportunity to find out where our markets are and go in and undermine our marketing initiatives.”

Wherever they’re going, business seems to be good for the moment. When Fisheries Minister Darin King announced that the government would be putting up a loan to Carino in April, Dakins told reporters the money would be paid back by Christmas.

He says they’re still on track for that; they’ve sold their entire backlog of previous year’s pelts, and at the current pace, they’ll sell out of this year’s stock by the time the hunt begins again next spring.

When asked how he characterizes the current business climate around seal products, he responds with one word: “optimism.”

He says he’s talking more and more about the ecological aspects of the seal hunt, and how it’s a sustainable source of fur, oil and meat.

“The explosion of seal populations globally and the decreasing availability of wild-caught fisheries. That’s what’s changing. People are starting to realize you can’t ignore one species,” he said. “People are starting to realize that management has to be considered on all levels of the ecosystem. You can’t manage one portion and ignore all the rest.”

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SEAFOOD.COM NEWS by Michael Ramsingh - October 1, 2012

Phillips Seafood continued its local marketing campaign over the weekend at Long Beach Island, NJs 24th annual Chowderfest, but failed to best the local competition.

The crowds at the well attended festival voted for the best red and white chowder this side of the keys. New England Clam Chowder bragging rights go to Howard's Restaurant winning both Critics Choice and Grand Prize.

Country Kettle Chowda came in first runner up, Four Cs Sons second runner up and Sea Oaks Country Club third runner up.

For the Manhattan Red Clam Chowder favorites, honors for both Critics Choice and Grand Prize go to Stefano's Seafood & Pasta, Black Whale Bar & Fish House for placing first runner up, Bistro 14 for second and Chicken or the Egg as third runner up. Rookie of the year was Atlantic City's Chart House.

Staff from Phillips Seafoods Atlantic City restaurant spent Sunday serving gallons of their Manhattan Style clam chowder to the thousands of attendees at this years event.

According to Phillips Executive Sous Chef Sean Duffee the restaurant prepared 170 gallons of their red clam chowder to compete against seven local establishments. Duffee and Phillips Executive Chef Paul Drew were hopeful of repeating last years success - the first time Phillips participated - when the restaurants signature New England style chowder won the Critics Choice Award for best New England style chowder, but this year they did not make it.

However, though Phillips was not among this years award winners, the exposure to thousands of consumers up and down the Jersey Shore was important for the companys brand name.

According to Michell Torres, Phillips Corporate Director of Marketing, Phillips participates in five to six local events each year to broaden the companys product beyond the Mid-Atlantic region.

In addition to the companys participation in the weekends ChowderFest, Phillips co-sponsored and operated a booth for the return of Atlantic City, NJs Seafood Festival earlier in September.

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St. john's Telegram]  by James McLeod  Oct 1, 2012

The seal tannery is bustling on a sunny September morning, as workers handle large stacks of pelts in various stages of processing.

The work here continues year-round as workers tan and dye the tens of thousands of seal skins that were harvested this spring on the sea ice around Newfoundland.

“This is a production facility more like Terra Nova Shoes than a fish plant,” Carino Processing Ltd. CEO Dion Dakins says as he takes The Telegram on an exclusive tour of the facility.

It’s steady work, and it employs around 25 people full time in the community of Dildo. The people in the plant are happy for the work and the contribution to the local economy.

“Lot of caring people; good outport people,” says worker Tony Johnson as he walks by.

It’s labour-intensive too, he says.

The pelts get tossed in sawdust, soaked in brine, treated with tanning chemicals, shaved, dried, dyed and then examined and graded before they’re ultimately sold and shipped to market.

But the whole works of it exists on a precarious position; Dakins says matter-of-factly that if the company hadn’t received a loan from the provincial government this spring, the plant wouldn’t be operating this year.

That would likely have been disasterous for the province’s seal industry; minimum processing requirements forbid the shipping out of raw pelts, and the Carino facility is the only tannery currently operating in the province.

“In 2006 we had five tanneries operating in Newfoundland and Labrador on seal products employing the same number of people in five communities around Newfoundland and Labrador,” Dakins says. “This industry will be successful when that many tanneries or more are operating again in Newfoundland and Labrador. That will be true success — taking the available quota based on sound science.”

Right now, that goal is a long way away. The hunt this year was fairly successful, but harvesters still only took a fraction of the total quota set by DFO.

And while Dakins is at great pains to make it clear that the provincial government loan was not a subsidy — it bears interest, and the terms of the loan require repayment — he also wouldn’t be in business without it.

Workers are very much aware of the political position of the seal hunt. They keep track of the Russian seal ban, and ongoing issues in the European Union.

“We hang in here,” says Wayde George, who’s been working in the industry for more than 30 years. “We have ups and downs. … I just hope it’s going to keep going the same.”

Animal rights groups like the Humane Society International and the International Fund for Animal Welfare have painted the government loan as a subsidy to the industry. Workers at the plant are very aware of the loan, and thankful for it.

But Dakins says the subsidy label has been a major problem for him in other parts of the world; it makes it more difficult to sell the pelts at market value.

In nearly every aspect of the tannery, the politically charged position of the seal hunt lurks.

Some of the pelts get dyed a light silvery “polar” colour, dilute enough that you can still see the animal’s spots. That product is very popular with many Newfoundlanders, who are proud to wear seal products.

But many, many more pelts get dyed dark brown or black. Those are more popular internationally, and they’re often used for hats and the trim on coats as a cheaper fur that’s comparable to mink.

When asked where they’re selling the pelts, Dakins flatly refuses to say.

“It’s been a standard thing within the industry, we’re not divulging our markets anymore,” he says. “What we don’t want to do is give animal rights groups the opportunity to find out where our markets are and go in and undermine our marketing initiatives.”

Wherever they’re going, business seems to be good for the moment. When Fisheries Minister Darin King announced that the government would be putting up a loan to Carino in April, Dakins told reporters the money would be paid back by Christmas.

He says they’re still on track for that; they’ve sold their entire backlog of previous year’s pelts, and at the current pace, they’ll sell out of this year’s stock by the time the hunt begins again next spring.

When asked how he characterizes the current business climate around seal products, he responds with one word: “optimism.”

He says he’s talking more and more about the ecological aspects of the seal hunt, and how it’s a sustainable source of fur, oil and meat.

“The explosion of seal populations globally and the decreasing availability of wild-caught fisheries. That’s what’s changing. People are starting to realize you can’t ignore one species,” he said. “People are starting to realize that management has to be considered on all levels of the ecosystem. You can’t manage one portion and ignore all the rest.”

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[CBC News] By Andrew Vaughan - October 1, 2012 - 
According to Humane Society International, more than 50 Chinese environmental and animal rights groups have sent an open letter to the Canadian Senate asking it to stop exports of seal products to China.
The letter slam seal products as products of animal cruelty could be setting the stage for Chinese leaders to ban seal imports as well.
China is the only major market left for Canadian seal exports.
The United States, Europe and Russia all have banned the trade of seal products, following intense lobbying by animal welfare organizations.
“We are writing to the Senate because we are disappointed in the Canadian government,” said Qin Xiaona, director of Beijing's Capital Animal Welfare Association, as quoted in a release by Human Society International/Canada.
“We want Canadian Senators to realize that Ottawa's promotion of seal products in China is unwise and short-sighted. It has caused irreparable damage to Canada's reputation in China," the release said.
"Our campaign against seal product trade will continue until the Canadian government ceases its efforts to promote these products of cruelty in China.”
The letter comes just weeks before the Senate decides whether to continue debating a proposed bill to stop the seal hunt by Liberal Senator Mac Harb, who argues that the hunt is no longer economically viable.
But the Senate bill is unlikely to go anywhere because both the Liberals and the Conservatives support the hunt.
Sealers' perspective
Frank Pinhorn of the Canadian Sealers Association said all these politics ignore the basic fact that seal populations are exploding and decimating fish stocks.
If we leave them [seals] alone", he said, "we'll have seals on our lawns in five to six years. They'll be up in the river, up the ponds, the bays. The shrimp and the crab fisheries and all the other fish species will be decimated."

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