jaymanntoday

Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

UNREAL CLOVIS FIND – LITERALLY: I have been a bit mum on what’s now a huge news story about a young boy finding an ancient Paleo-Indian artifact in the Queen City surf. I’ve been holding back because…

UNREAL CLOVIS FIND – LITERALLY: I have been a bit mum on what’s now a huge news story about a young boy finding an ancient Paleo-Indian artifact in the Queen City surf. I’ve been holding back because it absolutely is NOT an LBI-based artifact. Read on.
I’ll unhesitatingly go along with the young man’s find but I guarantee it is a mainland artifact that somehow made it over here. 
Am I expert enough to say this? Absolutely. I have what might be called a working knowledge of Native American artifacts, having been a collector for over 40 years, here in NJ, and also in Mexico, Central America and South America. In a slightly different vein, I dug (and donated) amazing Polynesian artifacts in Hawaii. But, what I excel at is an odd discipline, namely the shoreline transport of artifacts within dredged material. In this case, “artifacts” mean any items, natural or manmade, within the sand. 
Technically, I have been intensely studying the transport of sand dollars from the beach-fix projects. These famed echinoderm skeletons were not on LBI beaches prior to the pumping in of nearshore sand. Even now, I defy anyone to find a single sand dollar in non-replenished areas. You won’t find any. 
But back to the artifacts. I know what items have been transported south of the most southerly replenishment point, Brant Beach. Last spring, I quite excitedly found sand dollars as much as a quarter mile from the southernmost point of the sand placement. Wahoo! A fairly heavy, cryptocrystalline Clovis point tumbling five miles from Brant Beach to Beach Haven? Sorry. It’s a no-go. 
I’ll skip the fact that not a single other Native American artifact has been found in replenished Surf City, Harvey Cedars and Brant Beach areas -- short of those Woodland Indian items that have long been found in the vicinity of Harvey Cedars, prior to replenishment. 
But, for what-if’s sake, let’s say the Clovis point had traveled miles and miles and miles in the roiled surf line. Can you imagine the wearing away it would have undergone? The found artifact displays distinct, beautifully-flaked conchoidal fractures, done via human chipping, aka knapping. It is NOT an ocean artifact. Even its dark coloring, disguising its tan chert color, would have been abraded away almost immediately. Simply put, it is an excavated mainland artifact. Sorry, artifact seekers of Beach Haven. 
But why was it in Beach Haven? 
I’m not going to touch any out-there possibilities. I can confidently point out that there had been some mainland sand used to sure-up Beach Haven’s eroded beaches, on a number of occasions. I can definitely live with that Clovis point transport possibility. In fact, I have found Paleo-Indian artifacts within Cox’s Pit, Stafford Township, where Perry Lake now resides. That’s a stone’s throw from the quarry where the Beach Haven fill originated. 
Again, I’m not trying to rain on the young man’s news parade, just adding some science. 
(Photo Just-dug Clovis point..)
Photo: UNREAL CLOVIS FIND – LITERALLY: I have been a bit mum on what’s now a huge news story about a young boy finding an ancient Paleo-Indian artifact in the Queen City surf. I’ve been holding back because it absolutely is NOT an LBI-based artifact. Read on. I’ll unhesitatingly go along with the young man’s find but I guarantee it is a mainland artifact that somehow made it over here. Am I expert enough to say this? Absolutely. I have what might be called a working knowledge of Native American artifacts, having been a collector for over 40 years, here in NJ, and also in Mexico, Central America and South America. In a slightly different vein, I dug (and donated) amazing Polynesian artifacts in Hawaii. But, what I excel at is an odd discipline, namely the shoreline transport of artifacts within dredged material. In this case, “artifacts” mean any items, natural or manmade, within the sand. Technically, I have been intensely studying the transport of sand dollars from the beach-fix projects. These famed echinoderm skeletons were not on LBI beaches prior to the pumping in of nearshore sand. Even now, I defy anyone to find a single sand dollar in non-replenished areas. You won’t find any. But back to the artifacts. I know what items have been transported south of the most southerly replenishment point, Brant Beach. Last spring, I quite excitedly found sand dollars as much as a quarter mile from the southernmost point of the sand placement. Wahoo! A fairly heavy, cryptocrystalline Clovis point tumbling five miles from Brant Beach to Beach Haven? Sorry. It’s a no-go. I’ll skip the fact that not a single other Native American artifact has been found in replenished Surf City, Harvey Cedars and Brant Beach areas -- short of those Woodland Indian items that have long been found in the vicinity of Harvey Cedars, prior to replenishment. But, for what-if’s sake, let’s say the Clovis point had traveled miles and miles and miles in the roiled surf line. Can you imagine the wearing away it would have undergone? The found artifact displays distinct, beautifully-flaked conchoidal fractures, done via human chipping, aka knapping. It is NOT an ocean artifact. Even its dark coloring, disguising its tan chert color, would have been abraded away almost immediately. Simply put, it is an excavated mainland artifact. Sorry, artifact seekers of Beach Haven. But why was it in Beach Haven? I’m not going to touch any out-there possibilities. I can confidently point out that there had been some mainland sand used to sure-up Beach Haven’s eroded beaches, on a number of occasions. I can definitely live with that Clovis point transport possibility. In fact, I have found Paleo-Indian artifacts within Cox’s Pit, Stafford Township, where Perry Lake now resides. That’s a stone’s throw from the quarry where the Beach Haven fill originated. Again, I’m not trying to rain on the young man’s news parade, just adding some science. (Photo Just-dug Clovis point..)
((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((())))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))

Public Asked to Be Alert for EHD in Deer

August 13, 2014

The NJDEP Division of Fish and Wildlife is asking those who are out in the fields and woods of New Jersey at this time of year to be alert for deer that may be affected by Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) and to report any suspected cases to the Division.

EHD is a common viral disease in deer that is contracted from the bite of a species of midge known as Culiocoides sonorensis. New Jersey has experienced seven outbreaks of EHD since 1955. Outbreaks typically begin in August; symptoms of EHD in deer may include difficulty standing, drooling, and/or emitting foam from the mouth or nose. Deer with any of those symptoms, as well as dead deer with no apparent wounds observed in or near water, should be reported to any one of the following numbers:

Office of Fish and Wildlife Health and Forensics:
   Bill Stansley, 908-236-2118

Bureau of Wildlife Management:
   Northern Region - Carole Stanko or Dan Roberts, 908-735-7040
   Central Region - Jodi Powers, 609-259-6965
   Southern Region - Joe Leskie, 609-748-2043

EHD is not a public health issue and is not a cause for concern about human health. It cannot be transmitted to people, and humans are not at risk by handling infected deer, being bitten by infected midges, or eating infected deer meat, though the Division of Fish and Wildlife strongly advises against consuming meat from any game animal that appears ill.

The virus can infect livestock but only rarely causes a mild disease in cattle. People suspecting this disease in cattle should test their animals and can seek information from the State Veterinarian's Office at 609-292-3965. Dogs and cats are not affected by EHD virus.

Fore information: 
Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) in Deer in New Jersey (Office of Fish and Wildlife Health and Forensics) 
http://vet.uga.edu/population_health_files/HD-brochure-web.pdf (Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study)

(((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((()))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))

------------------------------------------------
Join us Marine Creations Taxidermy
www.marinecreations.com

------------------------------------------------ Join us Marine Creations Taxidermy Like / Comment / Share with friends <a href=www.marinecreations.com" width="470" height="359" />
Well it ended up being another good week for the MJ’s in the Midatlantic all things considered. After a slow week in WMO (which ended our streak of success in that tournament) I wasn't very optimistic on the bigeye fishing down south. On Day 1 we caught a 113 pound bigeye which we did not expect anything from at first, but this small class of fish held up. Best part is my dad was able to reel in another tournament winning fish and we ended up being a top money/point winner
...
The MJ's photo.
The MJ's photo.
What a horrible thing to have happen..
Southern Boyz Outdoors's photo.
Southern Boyz Outdoors's photo.
Southern Boyz Outdoors added 2 new photos.
back at him like a speeding bullet an hit Shawn perfectly in the corner of his eye, broke his eye socket and cheek bone breaking it in 3 places. He still can't see out of his eye. Shawn is scheduled to see a bone Doctor and a eye specialist. Not sure if Shawn will be able to see out of his eye again. Let this be a warning to everyone. If your hook gets hung up sometimes it's better to just cut the line free. Keep Shawn in your prayers.
(((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((()))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))

I had Jason Black of Short Hills, NJ, and Mike Weinstein of Brooklyn, NY out on a 4HR bay fluke trip. Both Duke University alumni worked hard at the fluke and we fished in a variety of spots changing with the water temps. We finally found a couple of decent fish and Jason put a nice fluke close to 5 pounds in the boat. Not to be topped with his 18" fluke, Mike ended up putting another nice fluke close to 5 lbs. in the box. We used some bigger bait which cut down on the shorts but definitely increased the quality. This was Jason's first time fishing in saltwater on a boat - awesome job by both.

I had Jason Black of Short Hills, NJ, and Mike Weinstein of Brooklyn, NY out on a 4HR bay fluke trip. Both Duke University alumni worked hard at the fluke and we fished in a variety of spots changing with the water temps. We finally found a couple of decent fish and Jason put a nice fluke close to 5 pounds in the boat. Not to be topped with his 18" fluke, Mike ended up putting another nice fluke close to 5 lbs. in the box. We used some bigger bait which cut down on the shorts but definitely increased the quality. This was Jason's first time fishing in saltwater on a boat - awesome job by both.
Lighthouse Sportfishing added 4 new photos.
1 hr · 

Did an inshore light tackle shark trip today a few miles off LBI. No drift whatsoever. C&R a small mako that came up the slick and took a pitch bait. The mako jumped once Broke off a shark that was bigger. Had another small mako or two in the slick followed by a hammerhead estimated @ 8-10'. Glad he did not take one of our baits.

If any are interested I do run inshore light tackle shark trips. Main target is brown sharks but you never know. Contact me for details.

Lighthouse Sportfishing's photo.
Lighthouse Sportfishing's photo.
Lighthouse Sportfishing's photo.
Lighthouse Sportfishing's photo.
((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((())))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
AJ Rotondella commented on a link.
 

Sandbar Shark. Sandbar Shark. Sandbar Shark. AKA Brown Shark. AKA this regions most abundant coastal shark. And also NOT known as man-eaters. Also, it is very disturbing to see how many of you would be FOR killing the shark if it were a Bull. I guess it doesn't occur to anyone that they can swim, have swam, and will swim again in this area. Though it may not exactly be a common occurrence by any means, actually relatively rare, but nothing is stopping them. Killing one shark ...

See More

LONGISLAND.NEWS12.COM
((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((())))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
Alright! 
 

We're pleased to announce that we have completed writing for our upcoming new album - which will be our Metal Blade Records debut!

With pre-production out of the way, work will begin on September 8th at Astia-studio in Lappeenranta in Finland with producer Anssi Kippo. Fans can expect to hear new music at the beginning of January 2015.

Sami offers the following update:...

See More
We're pleased to announce that we have completed writing for our upcoming new album - which will be our Metal Blade Records debut! With pre-production out of the way, work will begin on September 8th at Astia-studio in Lappeenranta in Finland with producer Anssi Kippo. Fans can expect to hear new music at the beginning of January 2015. Sami offers the following update: "Hi folks! "Only a couple more weeks to go! We head to Astia Studio on 8th of September and recordings will take around five weeks. "We had really good and creative pre production sessions with Anssi Kippo so now we are very well prepared to give 110% on each take in the studio. Because the songs were almost ready when we made the demo versions of them, Mr. Mikko Mustonen is already arranging orchestrations on top of those (Gotta love technology)! "There are still few minor details to arrange and couple of lines of lyrics to twist and turn but nothing can stop us anymore! We are convinced that this will be ground breaking album for us and the whole genre. (Modesty? What's that?)" The album is tentatively scheduled for release worldwide on Metal Blade Records in early 2015.

Views: 310

Comment

You need to be a member of jaymanntoday to add comments!

Join jaymanntoday

Badge

Loading…

© 2019   Created by jaymann.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service