jaymanntoday

Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

Monday, June 02, 2014: Winds continue to be testy, having swung around from the south, light whitecapping showing at midday. These should decrease slightly and even lay down before a cold front usher…

Monday, June 02, 2014: Winds continue to be testy, having swung around from the south, light whitecapping showing at midday. These should decrease slightly and even lay down before a cold front ushers in westerlies by midweek. After that, a nice stint of modest offshores should allow for bay, surf and nearshore angling, mainly surf.

Barnegat Bayside action has been stellar at times.

Mariner Note: Double Creek is unmarked and apparently ready for repair work to be begin on the channel. Use Oyster Creek.

On the other end, here’s an email:

Jay,

Just read your latest article in the SandPaper and was discouraged to hear about the condition of the Inlet. My father and I didn't put the boat in the water last season and we were looking forward to getting out there this season.

Quick question. What did you mean by legally opening the North Cut ? Marking it with buoys ?

And can you still run the north cut if you know what you’re doing ? 

Matt C. 

(You hit it, Mat. Placing markers at the north cut would officially reopen a now legally-closed Beach Haven Inlet. It's not happening this summer so your "...know what you're doing" angle hits home -- and hopefully not bottom. The North Cut (unofficially) is quite navigable so far this season. During a blowout tide???? You're on your own. J-mann)

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Had Rich out this am and had 4 keepers and dozen or so shorts.

Had Rich out this am and had 4 keepers and dozen or so shorts.
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Pez Machine Sportfishing

Nice one!
Nice one!

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There coming ccc guys!


Aerial photographer Wayne Davis was flying over Cape Cod Bay this week...
ONTHEWATER.COM
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State Record Marine Sport Fish

New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Record Fish Program honors anglers who catch the largest of select species of freshwater and saltwater fish. Record size is based on weight alone; there are no line classes. Currently there are 59 marine species eligible for entry into the program.

Anglers are reminded that the objective of the Record Fish Program is to increase awareness of fishing opportunities for species that are regularly sought and routinely found on or off the coast of New Jersey. The original list of 72 species was pared down with that objective in mind.

Twelve species are now retired from the list of program-eligible fish, but remain on a separate list posted on Fish and Wildlife’s Web site. One historical catch is also retired and posted on the list.

Anglers should be aware of the procedure in effect for entering the Record Fish Program. First, separate applications are required for freshwater and saltwater species. Second, for saltwater entries, it is now mandatory that a marine biologist inspect any potential record fish, as identification solely by photo is not always accurate. Anglers must call Fish and Wildlife’s Nacote Creek Research Station at (609) 748-2020 to make arrangements for inspection. In most instances, the fish must be transported to this office in Port Republic. However, in the case of extremely large fish (i.e., shark and tuna), a biologist should be available to travel for dockside inspection. Note that all scale certification requirements still apply, including a valid Certificate of Inspection/Test Report and current Registration Certificate issued by the County Office of Weights and Measures.

The entry deadline is now no later than one month after the date of catch. Note that the triggerfish category is now defined as gray triggerfish.

For a complete list of state record fish or to print an application with complete program rules, visit the Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Web site at NJFishandWildlife.com/fishing.htm.

New Jersey State Record Marine Fish













Species­

Lbs.

Oz.

Year

Angler

Where Caught

Amberjack, greater

85

0

1993

Edwin Metzner

Off Cape May

Bass, black sea

8

4.5

2010

Andrew A. Merendino

Off Cape May

Bluefish

27

1

1997

Roger Kastorsky

5 Fathom Bank

Bonito, Atlantic

13

8

1945

Frank Lykes, Jr.

Off Sandy Hook

Cobia

87

0

1999

John Shanchuk

Off Sea Bright

Cod

81

0

1967

Joseph Chesla

Off Brielle

Crab, blue

8¾” pt. to pt.

2009

Raymond Ponik

Bayonne

Croaker, Atlantic

5

8

1981

Frederick Brown

Delaware Bay

*Cunner

3

0.5

2012

Raul de la Prida

Off Pt. Pleasant

Dogfish, smooth

19

9

2010

Richard A. Proot, III

Mantoloking

Dogfish, spiny

15

12

1990

Jeff Pennick

Off Cape May

Dolphin

63

3

1974

Scott Smith, Jr.

Baltimore Canyon

Drum, black

109

0

2008

Nick Henry

Delaware Bay

Drum, red

55

0

1985

Daniel Yanino

Great Bay

Eel, American

9

13

1988

Warren Campbell

Atlantic City

Fluke

19

12

1953

Walter Lubin

Off Cape May

Flounder, winter

5

11

1993

Jimmy Swanson

Off Barnegat Light

Hake, white

41

7

1989

Wayne Eble

Off Barnegat Light

Kingfish, Northern

2

8

2004

Chester Urbanski

Barnegat Bay

Ling (red hake)

12

13

2010

Billy Watson

Off Manasquan

Mackerel, Atlantic

4

1

1983

Abe Elkin

Manasquan Ridge

Mackerel, king

54

0

1998

Fernando Alfaiate

Off Cape May

*Mackerel, Spanish

9

12

1990

Donald Kohler

Off Cape May

Marlin, blue

1,046

0

1986

Phil Infantolino

Hudson Canyon

Marlin, white

137

8

1980

Mike Marchell

Hudson Canyon

Perch, white

2

12

1998

Michael King

Little Beach Creek

*Pollock

46

7

1975

John Holton

Off Brielle

Porgy

5

14

1976

Victor Rone

Delaware Bay

Sailfish

43

4

2006

Dr. John Tallia

Linden Kohl Canyon

Seatrout, spotted

11

2

1974

Bert Harper

Holgate Surf

Shad, American

7

0

1967

Rodger West

Great Bay

Shad, hickory

2

13

2011

Robert Macejka

Mantoloking

Shark, blue

366

0

1996

William Young, Jr.

Mud Hole

Shark, bull

Vacant (Minimum Weight 150 lbs.)

Shark, dusky

530

0

1987

Brian Dunlevy

Off Great Egg Inlet

Shark, hammerhead

365

0

1985

Walter Thacara

Mud Hole

Shark, porbeagle

Vacant (Minimum Weight 100 lbs.)

Shark, s-fin mako

856

0

1994

Christopher Palmer

Wilmington Canyon

Shark, thresher

683

0

2009

Bennett Fogelberg

Fingers

Shark, tiger

880

0

1988

Billy DeJohn

Off Cape May

Sheepshead

17

3

2003

Paul Lowe

Manahawkin Bay

Spadefish

11

6

1998

Cliff Low

Delaware Bay

Spearfish, longbill

42

0

1989

George Algard

Poor Man’s Canyon

42

0

1997

Joseph Natoli

Hudson Canyon

Spot

0

13

2003

Robert Belsky, Jr.

Little Sheepshead Creek

*Striped Bass

78

8

1982

Al McReynolds

Atlantic City

Swordfish

530

0

1964

Edmund Levitt

Wilmington Canyon

*Tautog

25

0

1998

Anthony Monica

Off Ocean City

Tilefish, golden

63

8

2009

Dennis Muhlenforth

Linden Kohl Canyon

Tilefish, gray

18

14

2013

Richard Englesbe

Off Tom’s Canyon

Triggerfish, gray

5

12

2008

Ronald Pires

High Bar Harbor

Tuna, albacore

77

15

1984

Dr. S. Scannapiego

Spencer Canyon

Tuna, big-eye

364

14

1984

George Krenick

Hudson Canyon

Tuna, bluefin

1,030

6

1981

Royal Parsons

Off Pt. Pleasant

Tuna, skipjack

13

4

1999

Craig Eberbach

Wilmington Canyon

Tuna, yellowfin

290

0

1980

Wayne Brinkerhoff

Hudson Canyon

Tunny, little

24

15

1977

Mark Niemczyk

Off Sea Bright

Wahoo

123

12

1992

Robert Carr

28-Mile Wreck

Weakfish

18

8

1986

Karl Jones

Delaware Bay

Whiting (silver hake)

Vacant (Minimum Weight 2.5 lbs.)

* Fish was previously certified by the IGFA as a world record.

For information concerning the New Jersey State Record Fish or Skillful Angler programs, visit the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Web site at NJFishandWildlife.com.

Please check this out: http://www.eregulations.com/newjersey/fishing/saltwater/

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MARINE MAMMAL STRANDING CENTER TO HOLD STRANDING VOLUNTEER WORKSHOP IN WARETOWN, OCEAN COUNTY

SATURDAY, JUNE 14, 2014 AT 9:00AM

 

WARETOWN - The Marine Mammal Stranding Center will be hosting a volunteer workshop 9 a.m. Saturday, June 14 at the Ocean County Training Center, 200 Volunteer Way in Waretown.

At the workshop, the Stranding Center staff will be training volunteers to be first responders for stranded marine mammals and sea turtles in New Jersey.

Space is limited. Interested volunteers must be at least 18 years old and reside within 15 minutes of a beach or coastal waterway. To sign up for the workshop or get more information, contact Sarah Miele, education coordinator, at 609-266-0538 or email edummsc@aol.com.

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With the start of June, the light tackle  action in the backbay continues to be excellent.  Today’s trip is a prime example. The Pincus charter started by welcoming the sun by only being able to keep two to three rods in the water.  Blues from 2-5 pounds covered up our baits providing non-stop action.  Blues where not the only thing on the menu.  Joe Cannon of Mt Laurel pulled in a nice keeper bass (attached pic).  On the change of the tide we switched over the fluke and boxed a nice keeper ending the day with a Barnegat Bay slam (striper, bluefish, and fluke) of keepers. 

Screaming drags, 

Capt. Alex

LightHouseSportfishing.com Barnegat, NJ

609-548-2511

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NOAA predicts near-normal or below-normal 2014 Atlantic hurricane season

El Niño expected to develop and suppress the number and intensity of 
tropical cyclones

May 22, 2014

2014 Atlantic Hurricane Outlook graphic

2014 Atlantic hurricane outlook.

Download here (Credit:NOAA)

In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued today, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a near-normal or below-normal season.

The main driver of this year’s outlook is the anticipateddevelopment of El Niño this summer. El Niño causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms.

The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season.  For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of 8 to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 3 to 6 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 2 major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher).

These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico.

“Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAA’s network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts,” said Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., NOAA administrator. “And even though we expect El Niño to suppress the number of storms this season, it’s important to remember it takes only one land falling storm to cause a disaster.”

Satellite view of Humberto, the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013.

Humberto was the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013. It reached peak intensity, with top winds of 90 mph, in the far eastern Atlantic.

Download here (Credit:NOAA)

Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic – which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years – has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this high-activity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Niño, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than we’ve seen in recent years.

“Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Niño characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAA’s climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Niño,” Bell said. “The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes.”

NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat. The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas.

Early testing on continued improvements to NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this year's model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings.  The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations.

 NOAA’s seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center.

"It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities," said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. "Just last month, Pensacola, Florida saw five inches of rain in 45 minutes – without a tropical storm or hurricane. We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn more about how to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/hurricanes."

Next week, May 25-31, is National Hurricane Preparedness Week. To help those living in hurricane-prone areas prepare, NOAA offers hurricane preparedness tips, along with video and audio public service announcements in both English and Spanish, featuring NOAA hurricane experts and the FEMA Administrator at www.hurricanes.gov/prepare.

NOAA’s outlook for the Eastern Pacific basin is for a near-normal or above-normal hurricane season, and the Central Pacific basin is also expected to have a near-normal or above-normal season. NOAA will issue an updated outlook for the Atlantic hurricane season in early August, just prior to the historical peak of the season.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us onFacebookTwitter and our other social media channels.

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FDA about to issue new guidance on mercury in seafood, says labeling not needed

 

SEAFOODNEWS.COM [Associated Press] By Mary Clare Jalonick and Lauran Neergaard - June 2, 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration is updating its advice for pregnant women on the appropriate levels of mercury in seafood but Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said Friday that it won't require mercury labels on seafood packages.
 
In a wide-ranging interview Friday with The Associated Press, Hamburg said the agency will update guidance on mercury in different varieties of seafood and what that means, a long-awaited move aimed at helping women better understand what to eat when they're pregnant.
 
"It's an advisory, not an effort to mandate labeling," Hamburg said. "Different seafood products do contain different levels of mercury, and so different seafood products can be rated in terms of levels of mercury."
 
Eating fish is part of a heart-healthy diet, and many types are good sources of omega-3 fatty acids that are important for brain development.
 
But fish also can absorb small amounts of mercury, a neurotoxin, from streams and oceans — and a small number of varieties harbor higher levels.
 
For most people, accumulating mercury from eating seafood isn't a health risk. But for a decade, the FDA has warned that pregnant women, those who may become pregnant, and young children avoid certain types of high-mercury fish because of concern that too much could harm a developing brain.
 
Consumer groups have sued the agency, saying the warnings weren't clear enough about what to avoid, and seeking labeling to help so that shoppers wouldn't have to remember which products are OK during pregnancy or for youngsters.
 
"We can't ask consumers to memorize two different lists of fish," said Caroline Smith DeWaal of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, one of the groups that sued.
 
DeWaal said the new advisory will be an improvement if it gives consumers better information, especially if that information could be kept at fish counters in grocery stores and retail outlets.
 
The seafood industry says the government shouldn't look at mercury by itself, but at the benefits of seafood. Jennifer McGuire of the National Fisheries Institute says the original FDA guidelines warning against some types of fish for pregnant women just served to decrease overall seafood intake.
 
"That would be very concerning if there was a 'good fish, bad fish' list," she said.
 
The government's 2010 Dietary Guidelines incorporated FDA's warnings to say that pregnant or breastfeeding women should consume 8 to 12 ounces of a variety of seafood per week. But it said they should not eat tilefish, shark, swordfish and king mackerel because of the mercury content and it advised limiting white albacore tuna to six ounces a week.
 
On other food-related issues, Hamburg said deciding which businesses will have to post calorie labels has been "one of the more complex undertakings of my tenure as FDA commissioner."
 
The food industry is closely watching FDA to see which establishments are included in final menu labeling rules, which are expected this year. Congress required the labels in 2010 health overhaul, and supermarkets and convenience stores have lobbied aggressively since then to be excluded. But the restaurant industry says that all establishments serving prepared foods should have to post the labels.
 
She said the increasing amount of caffeine in a whole range of foods "has gotten our attention and concern" and that the agency needs to better understand the role of the stimulant in non-traditional products, especially on children. She said the science is not absolutely clear about its effects.
 
The agency is investigating the safety of energy drinks and energy shots, prompted by consumer reports of illness and death. FDA is also looking at caffeine in food as manufacturers have added caffeine to candy, nuts and other snack foods in recent years.
 
On genetically modified foods, Hamburg reiterated her support for voluntary labels, and said a "considerable amount of scientific study" does not suggest the kinds of public health concerns that some consumers have worried about. Advocates for GM labeling have been pushing state laws that require the labels.
 
As such, she says she does not believe FDA should have to do a mandatory safety review of all engineered foods. FDA now reviews the safety of GM animals, but has a voluntary review for companies that want to sell modified crops for consumption.
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Pew report shows ongoing IUU bluefin fishing in EU; urges industry to require electronic monitoring


SEAFOODNEWS.COM [SCOM] June 2, 2014

Pew has released a report that shows illegal bluefin tuna purse seine fishing continues to jeopardize the population’s recovery in the Mediterranean Sea, which reinforces the need for EU fishery officials to require the industry to convert to an electronic monitoring system.  

According to an inquiry conducted in cooperation with MedReAct.org, The Pew Charitable Trusts has identified at least 79 media reports (73 in Italy, 5 in Spain, 1 in Tunisia) of illegal bluefin seizures in the Mediterranean in the last 12 months. According to these published reports, authorities seized at least 186 metric tons of tuna – enough bluefin to fill 6 standard 40’ shipping containers. That fishing is in excess of the science-based quota in place, which for the EU amounts to 7,939 metric tons per year.

“Without doubt illegal fishing remains a significant threat to Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean and this population has a long way to go before it fully recovers from decades of unsustainable management” said Amanda Nickson, director of global tuna conservation for The Pew Charitable Trusts. “As the fishing season ends, we're reminded that every fish caught illegally undermines the recovery of this population and the actions of legal fishers operating by the rules within the set quota”

According to the most recent stock assessment, the eastern bluefin population is still only part of the way to its rebuilding target set by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), with the speed and magnitude of this recovery highly uncertain.

Illegal fishing could be immediately and effectively reduced by full implementation of the state of the art electronic catch documentation system – eBCD- which will replace the old, inefficient paper-based system.  In 2010, ICCAT noted that the paper-based bluefin catch documentation system “suffered from a number of shortcomings… which if not improved could weaken the management of E-BFT particularly within the purse seine and farming sectors.” Further, it recognized that an electronic tracking system was needed to more effectively “detect fraud and deter IUU shipments” as the paper system was inefficient and ineffective at preventing illegal fishing, fraud and misreporting.  After several years of delays, the electronic system, or eBCD, is finally scheduled to be implemented in March 2015. 

“With 59 percent of the eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna quota and given the illegal catch uncovered in an informal review of media reporting in the region, it is critical that the EU strongly support the timely implementation of a robust eBCD system to finally address illegal activity and assure buyers that bluefin from its waters have been caught legally.”

In Rossano, Italy, the Coast Guard seized more than 1,700 kilos of bluefin tuna from a factory because the owner could not produce catch documents that could trace the 67 fish.

The Port Authority in Pescara intercepted 2 vans with 1 ton of bluefin tuna (30 fish) headed for market in Rome, while traffic police in Salerno stopped a truck with 2.5 tons of bluefin tuna with no catch documentation.

One case involved 38 tons of bluefin tuna suspected of being illegally traded within Italy and France over more than a year’s time, worth over 300,000 euro.

Nickson added, “We’re pleased to see that authorities are making an effort to crack down on the illegal bluefin trade. Still, these are just the cases we know about. By its very definition, illegal and unreported trade flies under the radar, which makes advances in reporting and technology even more integral to developing a transparent and sustainable trade.”

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And it's going to fall shorter and shorter -- buncha numbnuts up there killing the stocks.

Maine's elver season falls short of statewide quota

 

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS [Bangor Daily News] By Bill Trotter - June 2, 2014 - 

ELLSWORTH, Maine, The 2014 elver fishing season is expected to come to a close Saturday, without the statewide catch quota being reached, according to state officials.

Jeff Nichols, spokesman for the Maine Department of Marine Resources, said as it looked as though Maine fishermen had caught about 9,300 pounds — or 85 percent — of the statewide quota of 11,749 pounds as of Friday morning. That limit was adopted last winter by the Atlantic State Marine Fisheries Commission out of concern Maine’s elver fishery was having an adverse effect on the East Coast population of American eels.

Nichols said the estimate for the statewide landings total could change over the weekend as fishermen sell whatever they can catch before Saturday at noon, when all fishing gear must be out of the water.

DMR Commissioner Patrick Keliher said in a prepared statement Friday that the department is looking into several possible factors why the statewide catch total fell short of the mandated quota.

Keliher said the cold weather at the start of the season — which began April 6 after being delayed by two weeks as state officials sought to get new management measures in place — tends to discourage elvers from migrating upstream from the ocean into rivers and streams. He added that harvester activity was slow in the first week; with no more than 33 licensed fishermen, out of approximately 950 licensed statewide, were out fishing on any given day.

The department capped the number of elver licenses issued to 432, while the rest are issued by Maine’s Indian tribes to its members. Each fisherman in Maine was assigned an individual quota this year based on his or her historical catch volume.

This is the first year Maine had quotas on the amount of elvers — baby American eels — that could be harvested. In the past two years, after demand in Asia soared in 2011, Maine fishermen caught at least 18,000 pounds during each annual 10-week fishing season.

In 2013, the statewide haul was 18,076 pounds, which generated a total of $33 million in income for Maine fishermen. The year before, they caught a total of 20,764 pounds, cumulatively earning more than $38 million.

Keliher also said Friday the state has issued far fewer violations for fishing for elvers without a license this year than it did in 2013. He said Marine Patrol officers issued 219 such citations last year; only 13 have been issued this spring, though he said that’s an estimate that could tick upward.

Federal officials, however, have indicated they suspect significant illegal activity took place this year in the American eel fishery. Earlier this month, law enforcement officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with others from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Maine Marine Patrol, were in Ellsworth as part of a federal investigation.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials have declined to comment in detail about the ongoing investigation, though they said law enforcement officers have conducted searches at several locations along the East Coast from South Carolina to Maine. Maine and South Carolina are the only two states where elver fishing is allowed, with Maine’s fishery being much larger than the one in South Carolina; fishing for adult eels is allowed in several states, including Maine.

As for the decline in state citations, Keliher said incidents of alleged poaching in Maine have dropped off sharply since 2013 because of the individual quotas. The new requirement for each fisherman to use a state-issued electronic transaction card when selling their catch also has helped, he added.

“This drastic decline in violations is a testament to the success of this new system in reducing illegal activity in Maine, in improving our ability to manage this critically important marine resource and in our ability to reduce the enforcement burden on neighboring states,” Keliher said.

Waltham resident Darrell Young, president of the Maine Elver Fishermen’s Association, said Friday the price fishermen have received for their elvers stayed relatively high, compared to prices in the 2000s.

Young said he was getting $450 per pound when this season started in early April, which is low compared to average prices of more than $1,800 per pound in each of the prior two years. Still, $450 per pound is higher than pre-2011 prices, when the highest statewide average price was $346 per pound in 2007, according to DMR statistics.

With the season winding down, prices have been holding steady around $1,000 per pound, Young added. In a separate interview, Pat Bryant, a fisherman and elver dealer in Nobleboro, said prices rose to around $1,000 per pound.

Bryant and Young each said, despite the sub-quota statewide catch total, the run of elvers up Maine’s rivers and streams was strong this spring, and at times especially so.

“I think overall it was a good season,” Young said. “Short and sweet.”

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Another good night on the beach a 30in and a 20lb.

Jason Ocone's photo.
Jason Ocone's photo.
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Bad case of Mycobacteriosis -- might have to do with this fish living near some warm-water outflow. 
Anybody know what causes this on striped bass?
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Little man gettin sum..Vintage Marine.

Little man gettin sum..Vintage Marine.
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Jimmy's Flounder

Jimmy's Flounder
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NOT a paid advert. Just thought these looked good for jetties. 

Hi Jay!
I hope you have been having a great week.  I wanted to send you info on a new, easy on/easy off, super lightweight, over the boot traction device called the 
FreeSteps6 by 
Hillsound Equipment. Tested by top fishing guides in British Columbia, Wyoming, Montana and Minnesota, the FreeSteps6 offers secure footing on steep muddy banks and slick rocks in still or moving water. The FreeSteps6 are easy to pull on or off, so you don't scratch the bottom of your boat when getting in or out. Also, anglers don't have to worry about transferring invasive species that felt-bottomed boots are known to do.  No longer are anglers subject to expensive, heavy and inconvenient traction options.  At $39.99, the FreeSteps6 are what every angler needs in their fishing quiver!  Below and attached are additional product details. Please don't hesitate to let me know if you would like any additional information or if you would like to receive some samples to check out.
All the Best,
Caroline Kelm
 
FreeSteps6 
Product Details:
 
Independent Stud System
  • Provides added safely and traction on slimy river beds, steep banks, muddy slopes and icy terrain.
  • The minimalist 1/4 inch spikes are lightweight, fully optimized stainless steel.
  • FreeSteps6 traction gives the confidence of movement you need to fish rivers you have never attempted before.
  • Weight is dispersed effectively over the 21 spikes to give improved resistance again wear and tear.
Welded Chains
  • Withstand repeated foot strikes and abuse on river beds.
Redesigned Thermo-Plastic Harness
  • Providing tear resistance and maintains pliability to sub-freezing temperatures.
  • Easy to get on a off when you're getting in and out of a boat.
Caroline Kelm
Groundswell PR
M: 843.822.8893
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Oh, just in case you were wondering: 

Warren Buffett Tells You How to Turn $40 Into $10 Million

http://www.fool.com/ecap/the_motley_fool/homerun-warren-buffett-tel...

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