jaymanntoday

Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

>Sunday, August 25, 2013: Very nice weather and decent angling conditions, though fluke drifts are hard to come by, early day, with do-nothing winds. The overall fishing pressure this weekend has rea…

>Sunday, August 25, 2013: Very nice weather and decent angling conditions, though fluke drifts are hard to come by, early day, with do-nothing winds. The overall fishing pressure this weekend has really fallen off. I’m guessing it might be fall cleaning -- and readying the pack for a return to school. Many a churchgoing angler I talked to wants to fish fall but must sneak time in among home repairs left over from Sandy -- including, for some, big moves, like house raisings and deep-rooted remodeling. Many ground level units of duplexes were left in the lurch last spring, to get upstairs property through summer. On the up side of repair things, I’ve been invited into dozens of fixed up homes that look incredible after mandatory post-Superstorm facelifts. I’ll also note a common theme: “We had been meaning to do this for a long time,” i.e. even before Sandy.

I remain stunned and pissed that the Holgate beaches adjacent to the Forsythe Refuge might not open to buggies until Oct. 1. This week I’ll put in all the numbers to reach Mayor Joe Mancini. He’s not big on listening to anyone but himself -- and his builder buddies. I’m not sure there is legal recourse through the courts or via Trenton but the beachfront technically belongs to the state. If this Mancini move plays out against the buggyists, I’m open for retaliatory actions.

The weakfishing in the bay, though not on the keeper schedule of most folks due to the regs, has gotten very hot. A bit unusual is the number of midsized models, i.e. not tiderunners but well over legal-sized -- if legal-sized were legal. This time of year it’s usually spike central out there. If you know The Dike, give it some late-day fly time. I’ll be toying bayside after dark tonight. Ideal (small) artificials tossing conditions expected.

Fluking has been so good for one fellow that his sizeable “winter freezer” is maxed out with fillets. “It looks great in there but I’ll bet I won’t want to see another piece of fluke by the end of winter,” he said, noting he used to go half fluke and half tog and seabass in the freezer. “I was doing Sandy repairs so I couldn’t get out to the wrecks this past spring.” Coolly, his wife goes bananas by putting up shelves and shelves of veggies and fruit preserves; easily 100 jars at a pop. Her pickling is beyond belief. Having recent Scandinavian heritage, she uses a pickled herring approach to putting up her veggies. It works to the max. She used to pickle Boston macks to die for, before the nearshore spring fishery quietly died. 

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Facebook cuisine note: Further see, http://www.garbagefish.com/

Yam, grilled Sea Robin, and yes, caught on IBSP!

Yam, grilled Sea Robin, and yes, caught on IBSP!

 

 

  • Nothing better Sunday morning. Barnegat bay and nice weakfish
    Nothing better Sunday morning. Barnegat bay and nice weakfish

 

 

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Inshore Fluke Trip in Rough Water

Went out in the am with my old friend Tim Hanlon and fellow BHMTC members Nick (son) and Richard Perello. It was blowing 15 kts out of the NE, we made our way out in a sloppy mess of 3 to 4’s. arriving at Little Egg Reef 3.5 miles out We set up with two sea anchors.

Our first fish was a 19 inch fluke that Nick caught; nice fish. It was very rough and someone was not feeling well so we left.  At first the motor would not start :( but then Rich was able to turn it over.  We had a wet ride back to the inlet, where we set up for more fluking.  In one episode both Tim and I got snagged on the bottom with my new $9.00 buck tail rigs :(  mine broke off, but was recovered and re snagged by Tim as he managed to salvage both rigs :).  

Nick knows some woman who are into bay fishing and consistently catch fish in the bay.  So we drifted their spot; Nick caught a 18 incher.  I was able to bring in a 18 incher on a bucktail rig I was using, he hit the high  minow section of the rig. So 3 nice keepers for a day that many did not even bother to go fishing. 

We packed it in at 2pm and hit the barn!  All and all it was a great day

 

 

 

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I have a lot on my mind FB... Fished tonight, nothing great but got some action and covered some of the most beautiful spots know to BASS!!! On my mind first is stocking foot waders... I have a great pair of welded waders and they DO NOT LEAK!!! knock on wood!! BUT I am a boot foot guy and putting these on drives me crazy.. put the wading shoe over the neo stocking foot... I always hated when clie...See More
I have a lot on my mind FB... Fished tonight, nothing great but got some action and covered some of the most beautiful spots know to BASS!!! On my mind first is stocking foot waders... I have a great pair of welded waders and they DO NOT LEAK!!! knock on wood!! BUT I am a boot foot guy and putting these on drives me crazy.. put the wading shoe over the neo stocking foot... I always hated when clients came with them... and they didn't have them on when they arrived... there goes an hour of get ready.. If you hire a guide .. arrive ready to go... waders on, rods rigged.. not in the tube... Man I love Striped Bass Surf Fishing as i type this all I can think about is one extra special hit I had tonight... as I was watching a satellite glide over the ocean this wise ass Bass totally wacked my Mr Wiggly like a train... and I missed her... how can you get slammmmedd like that and not hook up? and last but not least... what's up with getting a fish on the first cast... twice tonight I hit a spot and whack 1st cast a Bass... then nothing more... the 1st cast jinks ...that's why i hit many many spots a night! Good night all my friends out there... wish some place was open for foooooddd
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William Evans caught a nice 3.52# flattie today with his dad Jeff aboard the Jersey Hooker. Will now sits in 2nd place in the @[281352838655:274:Forked River Tuna Club] Fluke Junior Division.
William Evans caught a nice 3.52# flattie today with his dad Jeff aboard the Jersey Hooker. Will now sits in 2nd place in the Forked River Tuna Club Fluke Junior Division.
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This story applies hereabouts:

Eelgrass study seen as key to protecting Maine clam flats from green crab devastation

FREEPORT, Maine — As Maine’s softshell clam industry reels from the devastating invasion of European green crabs, local harvesters hope a new study of eelgrass habitat might also provide clues to protecting the state’s lucrative clam resource from the voracious creatures.

Early Friday morning, U.S. Geological Survey scientist Hilary Neckles led a team of volunteers into the thick, gray mud off Little Flying Point in Maquoit Bay. There, the team began assembling “exclosures” designed to protect several 100-square-foot pens from the crabs and allow transplanted eelgrass to grow undisturbed within.

Until 2007, eelgrass flourished in shallow Maquoit Bay, according to Neckles, but it then began to decline. By July 2013, nearly all the eelgrass was gone from the intertidal portion of the bay.

At the same time, the green crab population “exploded,” Neckles wrote in her project description, and eelgrass shoots were found “clipped and shredded” at the base — a sure sign that they had been destroyed by green crabs.

Neckles hypothesizes that the crabs are at least in part responsible for the decline in eelgrass. Local clammers are sure of it, and say the crabs are also destroying just about everything else in the bay.

Pounding the structure’s wooden posts deep in the mud on Friday, Brunswick clammer Chris Green said green crabs eat other crabs and lobsters, posing a major threat to the population of species that local fishermen rely on for their livelihoods.

“This is potentially catastrophic for the shorelines — for the ecosystem in the area,” he said.

Green crabs have crawled through the Brunswick mudflats for years, but in the last 18 months “the population has increased significantly to the point where [controlling them] now becomes a priority,” Brunswick Marine Resources Officer Dan Devereaux said.

Harvesters in Freeport identified green crabs as a problem and with town funding, they enlisted the services of environmental consultant Darcie Couture to....

Couture, of Resource Access International, and formerly with the Maine Department of Marine Resources, said the crabs “are probably the biggest issue out there facing shellfish harvesters in the area … it’s really a problem every [coastal] town has. Just not all of them realize it yet.”

In Freeport, harvesters have set traps for the crabs and installed fencing to keep them from the shellfish beds. According to Devereaux, Freeport harvesters have removed tens of thousands of pounds of the crabs and given them away as compost. Brunswick harvesters now trap the crabs as well, and some are given to local lobstermen as bait.

European green crabs have lived off American waters since stowing away on ships during the late 1800s, according to Couture. They then “crept their way up the Eastern Seaboard,” and were first reported in Maine in the early 20th century.

When their numbers increased in the 1950s, the infestation was quelled by a series of particularly harsh winters.

But a trend toward warmer-than-average winters doesn’t suggest that solution is likely this time.

Neckles said it remains to be seen whether green crabs can be pinpointed as a cause of eelgrass decline, although studies in Nova Scotia have shown that to be the case.

“In one bay, they had a very intensive removal program where in 2010 or 2011 they removed over 1 million crabs and were now restoring eelgrass successfully,” she said.

Couture is more definite about the impact the crabs are having. Only a month into the Freeport study, she said “early results are showing significant differences” using fencing to keep the crabs away from clam beds.

And Devereaux said he hopes Brunswick will undertake an effort next year to install similar fencing to protect their beds from the green crabs.

Couture said the work being done in Freeport, Harpswell and now in Brunswick is evolving into a regional effort to eradicate the crabs.

She said she’s concerned that after consuming local clams, the crabs would likely move on to Brunswick’s quahog resource.

“We’re trying to take a full approach to how we can save the softshell clam industry,” she said.

 

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