jaymanntoday

Daily Fishing and Outdoor Report

7/22/14 ... Loads of stuff to check out as I get my weekly SandPaper column together ...

Lol.
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Capt. Dave DeGennaro 
 
I am running an Open Boat trip Thursday afternoon, July 24, from 12:30PM to 6:30PM. We will start with a few hours of fluke and/or bluefish in the bay and inlet. By 4 PM  the tide will be perfect for throwing shrimp at the inlet jetty for short stripers and all size blackfish with the 10 pound spinning rods. If you have never done this, it is something to see. Catching stripers and tog in the middle of the summer with just a hook baited with shrimp, no sinkers or terminal tackle. Every once in a while we catch a bass that measures 28" or better but most are 20 to 26 inches, big enough to scream line off of the light spinning outfits. We do catch quite a few houndfish throughout the season too, when we use this technique. Houndfish are 36 to 40 inch needlefish that jump and greyhound like billfish when you set the hook.
 
$450 for the trip divided by however many people sign up. Three people max.
 
I also have an Open Boat to Barnegat Ridge for Bonita on Monday, July 28. 6AM to Noon. $160 per person. Three people max. All fish are shared.
 
Capt. Dave DeGennaro 

Hi Flier Sportfishing 
732.330.5674 
www.hiflier.com
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Polly's Dock added 2 new photos — at Pollys Dock Boat Rentals.
· Beach Haven, NJ · 

Ethan and Connor McHugh Two to three Rays a Just short Fluke Brothers in Arms today . Does it get any better ?

Polly's Dock's photo.
Polly's Dock's photo.

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Check it out ...

https://www.facebook.com/StripedBassFishReports

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Introducing the Sportsman Mount! Check out all the versatile ways you can use our latest mount.

http://gopro.com/camera-mounts/sportsman-mount

New Jersey Fish Reports shared Brian Brendle's photo.
New jersey
Photo: New jersey
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Striped Bass Fish Reports shared Trent Hughes's photo.
Slay and fillet
Photo: Slay and fillet

(What tuna lack in coloration and glitz, they make up for in a fully artistic streamlined shape, worthy of a Remington bronze. j-mann)

Don Guardabasso with Ryan N Julia Schramm

 

One bite one 60+ yellowfin in the box

One bite one 60+ yellowfin in the box

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The NJDEP's fifth annual NJ WILD Outdoor Expo will be held Saturday and Sunday, September 13-14, at the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area in Jackson Township, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, rain or shine.

This fun-filled family event is designed for visitors to discover new ways to appreciate and enjoy New Jersey's great outdoors. Participants have an opportunity to try a broad spectrum of outdoor activities such as fishing, kayaking, hiking, shooting sports, rock climbing, camping skills, geocaching and wildlife watching. Demonstrations of sporting and tracking dogs, historical re-enactments, SCUBA dives, turkey calling, nature photography and much more await.

Admission and parking are free. Most activities are free (a few require modest fee). For more information, visit http://www.wildoutdoorexpo.com/ .

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Introducing the Sportsman Mount! Check out all the versatile ways you can use our latest mount.

The Japanese think of everything ... freaky.

Japanese scientist starts project to breed bluefin tuna from mackerel

SEAFOODNEWS.COM [Nikkei] July 22, 2014

The 2030s could find the world in the midst of a deepening food and energy problem due to an exploding population. But while most statistics paint a bleak picture of the future, there exists hope in the form of talented people and the innovative technology they are developing.

One such person is Goro Yoshizaki, a professor at the Graduate School of Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology. Alarmed by the possibility that the bluefin tuna will become extinct, he has kicked off a project to develop a technology that enables the fish to be spawned via mackerel. His aim is to establish a way to increase tuna production without harming the ecosystem. One reason he chose mackerel for the project is that it grows quickly and does not cost much to raise.

The two fish have very different body sizes, but both belong to the mackerel family, making them "relatives." Yoshizaki has so far succeeded in developing a method to produce rainbow trout using "masu" salmon, both of which belong to the salmon family, and to yield expensive tiger puffer via the grass puffer.

To produce tuna using mackerel, reproductive cells are removed from tuna and transplanted into mackerel. Male mackerel possessing tuna sperm then fertilize tuna eggs held by female mackerel. Yoshizaki's study is now at the stage where he has selected the type of mackerel suitable for producing tuna. He said he aims to finish developing the technology in five years and commercialize it in 10 years.

In farming tuna, young fish caught in the open sea are raised in a special facility. Because so many of the fish are captured before spawning, an increase in farming activity pushes down the number of tuna in the wild.

Currently, Japan accounts for 80% of global tuna demand. But with Japanese cuisine growing more popular around the world, consumption of the fish is on the rise in such places as China, the U.S. and Europe.

The global population is expected to exceed 9 billion in 20-30 years. Instead of fighting for a shrinking pool of natural resources, we should, like professor Yoshizaki, focus on finding ways to ensure a necessary supply for all.

ALWAYS TAKE YOUR FISH OIL WHEN YOU GET BLASTED ... 

Fish oil may save heavy drinkers from neurodamage, dementia

A breakthrough in latest research indicates that omega-3 fish oil might protect the individual from these alcohol-related health conditions.


Continuous alcohol abuse leads to an increased risk of dementia and brain damage, as proven by several studies in the past. A breakthrough in latest research indicates that omega-3 fish oil might protect the individual from these alcohol-related health conditions.

Published by PLOS ONE journal, the study shows that fish oil protects the brain cells highly exposed to alcohol against neuronal cell death and inflammation.

"Fish oil has the potential of helping preserve brain integrity in chronic alcohol abusers," Dr. Michael Collins, one of the researchers of the study, says in a statement. "At the very least, it is unlikely that it would hurt them."

Study researchers made use of brain cells of an adult rat, which they exposed to high alcohol concentrations equivalent to around four times the legal driving limit and seen in chronic alcoholics. These brain cells were then compared with other cells exposed to the same alcohol amount and omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fish oil compound.

The researchers discovered less neuroinflammation and neuronal death in brain cells of up to 90 percent to cells exposed to alcohol and DHA than those cells with alcohol exposure alone.

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HMS NEWS


 
Atlantic Shark Commercial Fishery Landings Update
 
January 1- July 16, 2014
 

Below are the preliminary landings estimates in metric tons (mt) and pounds (lb) dressed weight (dw) for the Atlantic shark commercial fisheries; 1 mt is equal to 2,204.6 pounds.  These preliminary estimates are based on dealer reports and other information received from January 1 through July 16, 2014.  The estimates include landings by state-only permitted vessels, federally permitted vessels, and the 2014 shark research fishery participants.  

 
 

Management Groups

Region

2014

Quota

Estimated Landings in 2014

% of 2014 Quota

2013

Landings During The Same Time Period

Blacktip Sharks

Gulf of Mexico

274.3 mt dw

(604,626 lb dw)

200.9 mt dw

(442,799 lb dw)

Closed 2

73%

231.3 mt dw

(509,984 lb dw)

Aggregated Large Coastal Sharks

151.2 mt dw

(333,828 lb dw)

152.7 mt dw

(336,551 lb dw)

Closed1

101%

147.6 mt dw

(325,476 lb dw)

Hammerhead Sharks

25.3 mt dw

(55,722 lb dw)

14.0 mt dw

(30,933 lb dw)

Closed 1

56%

10.1 mt dw

(22,156 lb dw)

Aggregated Large Coastal Sharks

Atlantic

168.9 mt dw

(372,552 lb dw)

35.0 mt dw

(77,262 lb dw)

21%

88.1 mt dw

(194,327 lb dw)

Hammerhead Sharks

27.1 mt dw

(59,736 lb dw)

1.4 mt dw

(3,106 lb dw)

5%

8.4 mt dw

(18,523 lb dw)

Shark Research Fishery

(Aggregated LCS)

No regional quotas

50.0 mt dw

(110,230 lb dw)

9.1 mt dw

(20,008 lb dw)

18%

10.7 mt dw

(23,582 lb dw)

Shark Research Fishery

(Sandbar only)

116.6 mt dw

(257,056 lb dw)

27.2 mt dw

(60,029 lb dw)

23%

27.2 mt dw

(59,884 lb dw)

Non-Blacknose Small Coastal Sharks

Gulf of Mexico

68.3 mt dw

(150,476 lb dw)

32.1 mt dw

(70,677 lb dw)

47%

36.8 mt dw

(81,062 lb dw)

Blacknose Sharks

1.8 mt dw

(4,076 lb dw)

0.8 mt dw

(1,709 lb dw)

42%

0.6 mt dw

(1,411 lb dw)

Non-Blacknose Small Coastal Sharks

Atlantic

264.1 mt dw

(582,333 lb dw)

85.2 mt dw

(187,755 lb dw)

32%

53.5 mt dw

(117,985 lb dw)

Blacknose Sharks

17.5 mt dw

(38,638 lb dw)

13.7 mt dw

(30,160 lb dw)

78%

10.8 mt dw

(23,784 lb dw)

Blue Sharks

No regional quotas

273.0 mt dw

(601,856 lb dw)

7.8 mt dw

(17,103 lb dw)

3%

4.5 mt dw

(9,885 lb dw)

Porbeagle Sharks

1.2 mt dw

(2,820 lb dw)

0.1 mt dw

(248 lb dw)

9%

Closed for 2013

Pelagic Sharks Other Than Porbeagle or Blue

488 mt dw

(1,075,856 lb dw)

101.5 mt dw

(223,837 lb dw)

21%

55.5 mt dw

(122,342 lb dw)

        

Fishery closed at 11:30 p.m. local time on May 20, 2013 (79 FR 28849).
Fishery closed at 11:30 p.m. local time on June 2, 2013 (79 FR 31227).

 

This notice is a courtesy to the HMS fishery participants to help keep you informed about the fishery.  For further information on this landings update or the closure, contact Karyl Brewster-Geisz or Guý DuBeck at 301-427-8503.  The information will also be posted on the HMS website at:  http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/news/news_list/index.html. 

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This to-do piece is worth a local read:

TOM NIES: Oceana's Bycatch Report Ignores 

Efforts of Local Fishermen

Editor's Note: Saving Seafood
 has previously covered problems and concernssurrounding Oceana's report, "Wasted Catch: Unsolved Problems in U.S. Fisheries." 


You can read our comprehensive analysis of their report here. 


Newburyport, Mass. (Saving Seafood) -- July 22, 2014 -- Tom Nies is the Executive Director of the New England Fishery Management Council. His opinion piece appeared yesterday in the Providence Journal: 
 
The New England Fishery Management Council takes a different position from the one expressed in the July 1 editorial ("Frightening waste of fish"), as well as those reported in recent publications about wasteful fisheries bycatch and the related costs to fishermen and society.

The authors of those reports, staff from the international environmental advocacy organization Oceana, addressed important topics that all fisheries managers face. But there are numerous errors and inaccuracies in the Oceana report - so many that the eight regional fishery management councils, established by federal statute in 1976, collectively put together remarks that discuss the shortcomings of Oceana's publication. The letter is posted on the New England Council's website at FMCs letter to Oceana.

It may be helpful for readers to know that the U.S. fishery councils are charged by law to "prevent overfishing, rebuild overfished stocks, facilitate long-term protection of essential fish habitats and to realize the full potential of the nation's fishery resources." The councils are also charged with minimizing bycatch.

While no one disputes that problems remain in our fisheries, Oceana grossly misleads the public by lumping U.S. problems in the same report with global bycatch issues. Additionally, the fishery councils, after comparing the bycatch report's statements with core reference documents developed with the support of the federal fishery science centers, raised their serious concerns directly to Oceana about substantial errors, omissions and organizational approaches that are problematic throughout the publication.

Some of the errors were repeated in the editorial when it made reference to a few fisheries that operate in Rhode Island waters as "some of the biggest wasters among fisheries identified in the report." The paper did not expand on its remarks, but Oceana called out the gear type, the northeast bottom trawl fishery. Identified problems, it said, included killing and injuring "too many" sea turtles. It further claimed that, for the same vessels, shrinking quotas encourage the discarding of fish at sea.  

Other facts do not support these statements. According to federal documents prepared in 2013, there was a single interaction with a sea turtle in bottom trawl gear in the Gulf of Maine/Georges Bank region. It is well-known that although a small number of turtles venture north to New England during the summer, most prefer the warmer waters of the Mid-Atlantic. 

It was equally unclear to fishery managers how reduced quotas, generally associated with less fishing opportunities, could increase bycatch. The rationale was neither explained nor was any reference made to a recent action taken by the New England Council to reduce the minimum sizes of a number of groundfish species, taken primarily in order to avoid "regulatory discards" or tossing sub-legal size fish overboard. 

These examples illustrate only a few of the misstatements and factual errors the councils identified in the bycatch report. Their suggestion to Oceana was to follow a practice long ago adopted by federal fishery managers who are held to stricter scientific standards - to adopt a standardized peer review process to ensure that reports like the one discussed here accurately and objectively represent the best available science. 

Oceana chose not to reply to this suggestion. 

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I have a 2004 Ford Expedition, best truck I ever owned, it has 120k miles on it and I put all the miles on it. The one thing though, is that around 100k miles the coil packs start to go on them, this goes for all Ford 8 cylinders of that era. Every cylinder has it's own coil pack on that truck---that times 8 cylinders and it means the truck starts missing every 8 months or so and it's time for a new coil pack. So right now I have a dead miss and it's the 7th time! One cylinder left to go and I should be free and clear for another 500 miles before one of the replacements starts missing again. I should just buy a whole new set of 8. Anyone else have this problem?

I have a 2004 Ford Expedition, best truck I ever owned, it has 120k miles on it and I put all the miles on it. The one thing though, is that around 100k miles the coil packs start to go on them, this goes for all Ford 8 cylinders of that era. Every cylinder has it's own coil pack on that truck---that times 8 cylinders and it means the truck starts missing every 8 months or so and it's time for a new coil pack. So right now I have a dead miss and it's the 7th time! One cylinder left to go and I should be free and clear for another 500 miles before one of the replacements starts missing again. I should just buy a whole new set of 8. Anyone else have this problem?
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So many of this president's choices are and have been pathetic. I once had hope for his first presidency, but that soon evaporated. No matter what the creeps in congress have done, this man is the leader, but has yet to be one. He's caved in at every threat, and has been a war monger too. Sad for life period.

Deafening blasts may soon be hitting critically endangered North Atlantic right whales’ only known nursery ground. Loud enough to deafen or even kill a whale, seismic airgun blasts used to search for oil have just been approved for parts of the Atlantic coast, including an area near where these rare animals raise their young. We must act NOW: <a href=
http://bit.ly/1r3gsLV Image credit: Creative Commons" width="470" height="260" />

Deafening blasts may soon be hitting critically endangered North Atlantic right whales’ only known nursery ground. Loud enough to deafen or even kill a whale, seismic airgun blasts used to search for oil have just been approved for parts of the Atlantic coast, including an area near where these rare animals raise their young. We must act NOW:http://bit.ly/1r3gsLV

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